British Royal Family Should Visit Southeast Nigeria, Compensate, Apologise For Abandoning Igbos To Fulani Terrorists —Nnamdi Kanu’s American Lawyer
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Bruce Fein, an American legal practitioner representing the detained leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB), Nnamdi Kanu, has urged the British Royal Family to visit Southeast Nigeria and apologise for allegedly abandoning the people to Fulani terrorists.
 
His comment comes as an indigenous community in Canada called on the British Royal Family to formally acknowledge the harm colonisation had done to them. Britain’s Prince Charles and his wife Camilla are set to pay a visit to Canada this week.



A report by Reuters noted, “The royal couple will arrive in St. Johns, Newfoundland on Tuesday on a three-day trip that will include stops in Ottawa and the Northwest Territories and focus on the issues of reconciliation with indigenous peoples and climate change.
 
“The impact of colonisation, the residential school system and the loss of lands is what the crown represents, Mary Teegee, the executive director of child and family services at Carrier Sekani Family Services in the province of British Columbia, told Reuters.”
 
Teegee was quoted as saying, “They also have to understand that they are not the leaders in our nation,” adding that recognition of the harms of colonisation are needed rather than just a “trite” apology.
 
Meanwhile, Bruce Fein who took to his Twitter handle on Tuesday said the British Royal Family must pay a similar visit to Biafrans and make reparations for also “abandoning them to Fulani terrorists”.
 
He wrote on Twitter, “The British Royal Family is visiting Canada to acknowledge the UK’s inexcusable destruction of indigenous peoples by wrenching children from their culture. A more urgent visit is required to Biafra to apologize and make reparations for abandoning Biafrans to Fulani terrorists.”
 
The Indigenous People of Biafra, a secessionist movement in the Southeastern part of Nigeria, seeks the breakaway of the region.
 
IPOB was established in 2012 by Nnamdi Kanu, a British Nigerian political activist who is currently detained by Nigeria’s secret police, Department of State Services (DSS), over alleged involvement in terrorism.

President Muhammadu Buhari’s government in 2017 proscribed the group under the Nigerian Terrorism Act.

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