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Boston I.C.U. doctor reveals the heartbreaking reality of treating coronavirus patients

A Boston Intensive Care Unit doctor has revealed the heartbreaking reality of treating coronavirus patients in critical condition on the front line. 

Critical care doctor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Daniela J. Lamas detailed how many patients suffering from the illness die alone as loved ones are banned from visiting.  

For Dr Lamas, the ‘lonely deaths’ of COVID-19 victims are one of the hardest aspects of the pandemic to come to terms with as a medical practitioner.  

Critical care doctor Daniela J. Lamas (pictured) detailed how many patients suffering from the illness die alone as loved ones are banned from visiting

Critical care doctor Daniela J. Lamas (pictured) detailed how many patients suffering from the illness die alone as loved ones are banned from visiting

Critical care doctor Daniela J. Lamas (pictured) detailed how many patients suffering from the illness die alone as loved ones are banned from visiting

For Dr Lamas, the 'lonely deaths' of COVID-19 victims are one of the hardest aspects of the pandemic to come to terms with as a medical practitioner (Stock image)

For Dr Lamas, the 'lonely deaths' of COVID-19 victims are one of the hardest aspects of the pandemic to come to terms with as a medical practitioner (Stock image)

For Dr Lamas, the ‘lonely deaths’ of COVID-19 victims are one of the hardest aspects of the pandemic to come to terms with as a medical practitioner (Stock image) 

She described the crushing moment she had to inform a COVID-19 patient who also suffered from cystic fibrosis that her husband was no longer able to visit as the hospital changed its rules. 

‘I watched their faces shift. My patient’s breathing quickened, and her ventilator alarm sounded. Her husband quickly moved his hand to her shoulder and her breaths slowed; the alarms silenced. He knew how to calm her,’ she wrote in the New York Times

‘But now, as we tighten our protocols to protect our patients from the threat of Covid-19, she’s alone.’

In another case, Dr Lamas described how a patient was on FaceTime with his daughter when he began coughing up blood on the hospital floor and had to be placed on a ventilator. 

Dr Lamas works at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston (pictured)

Dr Lamas works at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston (pictured)

Dr Lamas works at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston (pictured)

‘So that is the last image she has of her father — on a shaky computer screen, blood staining his hospital gown,’ Dr Lamas lamented, adding that she wasn’t sure if or when the daughter would be able to see her father again. 

Even end-of-life visits by close family members sometimes had to be refused to prevent the spread of the killer virus to hospital patients.  

On another recent shift, a doctor was forced to refuse a visit from a daughter to her critically ill parents who were intubated with severe respiratory issues, as she had lived with them and had a fever herself, putting her at risk of infecting other patients. 

It means, if her parents die of this, ‘they will do so in separate sterile hospital rooms, far from anyone who loves them,’ Dr Lamas said. 

Dr Lamas (pictured) described the crushing moment she had to inform a COVID-19 patient who also suffered from cystic fibrosis that her husband was no longer able to visit as the hospital changed its rules

Dr Lamas (pictured) described the crushing moment she had to inform a COVID-19 patient who also suffered from cystic fibrosis that her husband was no longer able to visit as the hospital changed its rules

Dr Lamas (pictured) described the crushing moment she had to inform a COVID-19 patient who also suffered from cystic fibrosis that her husband was no longer able to visit as the hospital changed its rules

‘The devastating image of the lonely deaths of coronavirus patients in Italy hangs over us all,’ she said, saying she wished she could provide a level of comfort to patients, but that she, too, is ‘scared’. 

‘So I do what I need to do and then I leave. I don’t take the time to reassure, to explain, surely not to hold a hand. Truth is, I am scared.’

The state of Massachusetts reported four new coronavirus deaths on Wednesday, bringing the statewide total to 15. 

The state Department of Public Health recorded a total of 1,838 coronavirus cases, an increase of 679 since the day before.

Source: dailymail US

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