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COVID-19: The $10 beauty alternative to hand sanitiser – and there’s still plenty in stock

The scarcity of hand sanitiser has skyrocketed since COVID-19 reached Australian shores on January 25, with ‘sold out’ signs hanging over empty shelves where antibacterial gel used to sit.

But beauty experts have discovered an alternative in the form of a floral hand cream that looks and smells a whole lot nicer than pure alcohol rub.

Ecoya’s ‘Rinse-Free Hand Wash‘ kills almost as many germs as traditional hand sanitiser with its sweet smelling formula, which gently cleanses hands free of nasties.

The cream costs $10AUD and is available in a selection of tropical inspired scents including lotus flower, vanilla and patchouli, coconut and elderflower and guava and lychee from Ecoya’s official website and chemists nationwide.

Ecoya's 'Rinse-Free Hand Wash' (pictured) kills almost as much bacteria as traditional hand sanitiser with its sweet smelling formula, which gently cleanses hands of germs

Ecoya's 'Rinse-Free Hand Wash' (pictured) kills almost as much bacteria as traditional hand sanitiser with its sweet smelling formula, which gently cleanses hands of germs

Ecoya’s ‘Rinse-Free Hand Wash’ (pictured) kills almost as much bacteria as traditional hand sanitiser with its sweet smelling formula, which gently cleanses hands of germs

Like hand sanitiser, it can be used in place of washing your hands when you are out and about and unable to get to a sink.

The indulgent formula enriches natural oils in the skin, leaving hands soft and hydrated instead of dry and cracked which is the case with prolonged use of antibacterial gels.

Its alcohol content is roughly 50 percent, but official guidelines from Australian government say 60 to 90 percent is the ideal concentration for killing bacteria, which means the cream should only be relied on where hand washing is impossible.

The scarcity of hand sanitiser has skyrocketed since COVID-19 reached Australian shores on January 25, with 'sold out' signs hanging over empty shelves where antibacterial gel used to sit (pictured, a sold out notice is displayed in a Chemist Warehouse in Australia in March 2020)

The scarcity of hand sanitiser has skyrocketed since COVID-19 reached Australian shores on January 25, with 'sold out' signs hanging over empty shelves where antibacterial gel used to sit (pictured, a sold out notice is displayed in a Chemist Warehouse in Australia in March 2020)

The scarcity of hand sanitiser has skyrocketed since COVID-19 reached Australian shores on January 25, with ‘sold out’ signs hanging over empty shelves where antibacterial gel used to sit (pictured, a sold out notice is displayed in a Chemist Warehouse in Australia in March 2020)

Public health experts have repeatedly advised that routinely and effectively washing your hands with soap and warm water is the best way to ward off coronavirus. 

But many have resorted to making their own antibacterial gel for moments when washing your hands is simply not an option.

In order for any good home hand sanitiser to work, it must contain at least 60 percent alcohol.

To make your own hand sanitiser, take 2/3 cup of rubbing alcohol and mix in a large bowl with 1/3 cup of aloe vera gel and 5-10 drops of the essential oil of your choice.

How to make homemade hand sanitiser

Place 2/3 cup of rubbing alcohol (Isopropyl alcohol) in a bowl

Add 1/3 cup of aloe vera gel and mix well

Add 5-10 drops of essential oil and mix again

Ensure alcohol equals to 60% of mixture 

Use a funnel to transfer to a liquid soap container

Ensure container is tightly sealed

Ethanol can be used instead of rubbing alcohol

Alternative non-alcohol methods swap one tablespoon of witch hazel and half a teaspoon of tea tree oil for the rubbing alcohol

A two-ounce spray bottle or a liquid soap container can be used to hold the mixture to take on your commute or leave in your home or office.

If made properly and sealed tightly in its container, a homemade hand sanitiser can last for weeks. 

And if it contains sufficient volumes of alcohol, infectious disease specialists say DIY sanitiser can be just as effective as soap and water.  

Source: dailymail UK

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