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Fitness writer won’t work with ‘fat people’ due to ‘troubled minds’

A businesswoman has claimed she would never work with fat people because it shows the person has a ‘troubled mind’ and lacks ‘self-control’. 

Samantha Yardley, 34, from Coventry, who is a freelance fitness writer and sub-editor at Muscle & Health magazine, argues that while different body types should be ‘respected’, society shouldn’t ‘validate’ someone for being overweight with phrases such as ‘big is beautiful’. 

She added that the way a person presents themselves appearance-wise says as much about them as their credentials. 

Samantha told FEMAIL that she doesn’t condone ‘fat-shaming’ and insisted her mantra is born out of a desire to ‘inspire positive change’.

Samantha Yardley, 34, from Coventry, a fitness writer and sub-editor at Muscle & Health magazine, says she would never work with fat people because it shows the person has a 'troubled mind' and lacks 'self-control'

Samantha Yardley, 34, from Coventry, a fitness writer and sub-editor at Muscle & Health magazine, says she would never work with fat people because it shows the person has a 'troubled mind' and lacks 'self-control'

Samantha Yardley, 34, from Coventry, a fitness writer and sub-editor at Muscle & Health magazine, says she would never work with fat people because it shows the person has a ‘troubled mind’ and lacks ‘self-control’

‘As a businessperson myself and former employer; would I work with (extremely) fat people? No, I wouldn’t. Harsh but true (I’m sorry),’ she said.

‘For me, at best it demonstrates a troubled mind, lacking self-control and at worst it shows a severely disturbed individual who is likely to be lacking energy and suffering poor health. 

‘The way a person presents themselves physically says as much about them as the credentials they can list on a piece of paper. 

‘No, we shouldn’t judge people based on beauty, however as humans we can’t hide extreme, debilitating gluttony because we wear it as layers of fat. That’s biology, not bigotry.’

Samantha argues that while different body types should be 'respected', society shouldn't 'validate' someone for being overweight with phrases such as 'big is beautiful'

Samantha argues that while different body types should be 'respected', society shouldn't 'validate' someone for being overweight with phrases such as 'big is beautiful'

Samantha argues that while different body types should be ‘respected’, society shouldn’t ‘validate’ someone for being overweight with phrases such as ‘big is beautiful’

Samantha conceded that everyone has a propensity to gain weight, whether it’s the ‘traditional Christmas battle of the bulge’ or summer holiday overindulgence.

‘Most of us have fallen victim at one time or another,’ she explained. ‘That said, fitness model, bodybuilding stage lean also isn’t healthy and shouldn’t be considered sustainable year-round. 

‘A “normal” softer, achievable, relatable body type is a beautiful thing and one that should be celebrated. 

‘However, where I draw a very resolute line at body positivity is today’s society validating and excusing severely overweight and obese people.’

Samantha conceded that everyone has a propensity to gain weight, whether it's the 'traditional Christmas battle of the bulge' or summer holiday overindulgence

Samantha conceded that everyone has a propensity to gain weight, whether it's the 'traditional Christmas battle of the bulge' or summer holiday overindulgence

Samantha conceded that everyone has a propensity to gain weight, whether it’s the ‘traditional Christmas battle of the bulge’ or summer holiday overindulgence

Samantha argued that if you are unable to perform day-to-day tasks like taking a leisurely walk, getting up the stairs without being out of breath or using generic seating at restaurants, then you have a ‘big problem’. 

‘Yes, different body types should be respected and big is beautiful – to an extent – but severe extremes, be that dangerously under or overweight, should be treated as a condition that requires help, not commended or excused,’ she said. 

Samantha said she doesn't seek out six pack abs when choosing people to work with, but does look for individuals with 'enthusiasm and energy'

Samantha said she doesn't seek out six pack abs when choosing people to work with, but does look for individuals with 'enthusiasm and energy'

Samantha said she doesn’t seek out six pack abs when choosing people to work with, but does look for individuals with ‘enthusiasm and energy’

Samantha said she doesn’t seek out six pack abs when choosing people to work with, but does look for individuals with ‘enthusiasm and energy’. 

‘People who, not necessarily exude health (although that’s a bonus) but at the very least don’t personify excess to the point of welcoming an early grave,’ she went on.

‘Battling the bulge isn’t easy; if you fall into the morbidly obese category, seek help from a medical professional. 

‘Gaining energy, confidence and a new lease of life are beautiful things, but moreover you are literally extending your life. 

‘Cliché as it may sound, life is our most precious gift.’

Samantha pointed out that obesity has now overtaken smoking as the largest contributing factor to causing cancer.

‘Confidence and self-worth should always be nurtured and encouraged in every guise,’ she said.

‘I’m by no means condoning fat shaming or bullying, but equally let’s stop validating the result of toxic and harmful behaviour patterns.  

‘Let’s replace our misplaced kindness exonerating this damaging condition with catalysing change and providing help and encouragement to conquer this disease of modern times.’

For more information about Samantha visit her website – www.samanthayardley.com – or follow her on Instagram: @samanthajyardley  

Source: Daily Mail

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