Internewscast
Image default
News

George Floyd and Minneapolis Protests: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:

Video

Video player loading
Demonstrations raged overnight across the U.S. in the third night of unrest in response to George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis police custody.CreditCredit…Victor J. Blue for The New York Times

The Defense Department ordered the Army to prepare active-duty military police units to deploy to Minneapolis as protests over the death of George Floyd engulfed the city for a fourth night on Friday, with businesses set on fire and gunshots fired near a police precinct.

Officials said that the Army on Friday issued “prepare to deploy” orders for military police units from several army bases around the country. The orders came at the behest of President Trump, the officials said, who has been seeking options from his senior national security leaders, including Defense Secretary Mark Esper, for how to deal with the chaotic protests that have ignited in dozens of cities.

They continued with new ferocity on Friday night even after Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer who was shown on a cellphone video kneeling on Mr. Floyd’s neck as he lost consciousness, was charged with third-degree murder.

Already, National Guard units have been activated in Minnesota and in other cities — standard for dealing with civil unrest within the country. But deploying military police units would be an escalation in the government response to the unfolding events, officials said. Military police units were used in 1992 during the riots in Los Angeles that followed the acquittal of four officers involved in the beating of Rodney King.

In Minneapolis, flames streamed from several businesses overnight — a gas station, a post office, a bank, a restaurant — and protesters defied an 8 p.m. curfew, milling in the streets and facing off with officers, even forcing Guard troops to retreat at one point.

The police did begin to arrest protesters shortly before midnight, when demonstrators convened on the Minneapolis Police Department’s Fifth Precinct the day after they had taken over the Third Precinct and set it on fire. Unlike Thursday, the police did not flee from the building.

Even as most demonstrators left the streets early on Saturday morning, the fires continued to rage, leaving a trail of battered local businesses and hollowed out vehicles.

Gov. Tim Walz of Minnesota said the state was bracing for more protests on Saturday and that the authorities had been overwhelmed by the demonstrations, which he said had devolved into “absolute chaos.” He did not rule out accepting the help of the federal military, although he called it an extreme step.

If the military police are ordered to descend on Minneapolis, the units at Fort Bragg in North Carolina and Fort Drum in New York would likely be the first to be activated, officials said. The possible activation of the units was first reported by The Associated Press.

The “prepare to deploy” move does not mean that the units will be activated, the officials said, but it is a first step toward doing so.

Updated 1h ago
ImageA burning police car during a protest in Atlanta on Friday.
Credit…Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Rallies expanded far beyond Minneapolis on Friday, with protesters destroying police vehicles in Atlanta and New York, and blocking major streets in San Jose and Detroit. Crowds in Milwaukee chanted, “I can’t breathe” and demonstrators in Portland, Ore., lit a fire inside the Multnomah County Justice Center.

Hundreds of demonstrators poured into the streets near Atlanta’s Centennial Olympic Park, smashing windows and clashing with police officers. Not far away, some people climbed atop a large red CNN sign outside the media company’s headquarters and spray-painted messages on it. Others shattered windows at the College Football Hall of Fame, where people rushed in and emerged with branded fan gear.

“What are you changing by tearing up a city?” Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said in a news conference. “You’ve lost all credibility now. This is not how we change America. This is not how we change the world.”

In New York, thousands of people attended a demonstration at the perimeter of Barclays Center in Brooklyn. Some hurled bottles and debris at police officers, who responded with pepper spray.

A burned police van was still smoking near Fort Greene Park after two Fire Department trucks pulled away. Protesters slammed its doors off their hinges, threw fireworks into the charred seats, flattened the tires and placed a sign down that read, “Black Lives Matter.”

“I’m just really tired of sitting at home and just doing nothing, basically watching this happen,” said Jason Phillips, 27, of Queens, who was at an earlier protest in Manhattan. “I need to be a part of history. I need to be a part of the change.”

Protests Over Racism and Police Violence

Protests broke out in cities across the country over the death of a black man in police custody in Minnesota and other recent killings of unarmed black people.

Minneapolis

Des Moines

Fort Wayne

Sacramento

Washington

Indianapolis

Cincinnati

Louisville

Kansas City

Bakersfield

Albuquerque

Los

Angeles

New Orleans

Minneapolis

Des Moines

Fort Wayne

Sacramento

Washington

Indianapolis

Kansas City

Cincinnati

Louisville

Bakersfield

Albuquerque

Los

Angeles

New Orleans

Minneapolis

Des Moines

Fort Wayne

Sacramento

Washington

Indianapolis

Kansas City

Cincinnati

Louisville

Bakersfield

Albuquerque

Los

Angeles

New Orleans

Minneapolis Protests continued even as the city was under a curfew Friday night.

Houston Protesters marched through downtown, blocking interstate traffic.

Washington A large crowd chanted outside the White House, prompting the Secret Service to lock down the building.

Atlanta Vehicles were set afire, and buildings vandalized. Police used tear gas to try to disperse protesters.

By Jugal. K Patel, Jin Wu and Juliette Love

Minnesota’s top officials acknowledged early Saturday morning that they had underestimated the destruction that protesters in Minneapolis were capable of inflicting as a newly issued curfew did little to stop people from burning buildings and turning the city’s streets into a smoky battleground.

Gov. Tim Walz said at a news conference that the police and National Guard soldiers had been overwhelmed by protesters set on causing destruction days after George Floyd was pinned to the ground by an officer before dying.

“Quite candidly, right now, we do not have the numbers,” Mr. Walz said. “We cannot arrest people when we’re trying to hold ground because of the sheer size, the dynamics and the wanton violence that’s coming out there.”

Politicians and the police had not expected the protests to grow for a fourth night on Friday, after a police officer was charged with third-degree murder and a curfew went into effect at 8 p.m. But grow they did, and law enforcement officers struggled to hold their ground, with National Guard troops retreating from angry protesters at one point.

“There’s simply more of them than us” Mr. Walz said of the protesters.

The governor vowed that more Guard troops would be deployed and that the authorities would not let the destruction continue. Even so, state officials did not show much optimism that the demonstrations would stop, and Mr. Walz did not rule out the possibility of bringing in the U.S. military.

Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis, looking weary after four days of outrage in his city, pleaded with residents to go home and stop burning down the local businesses that he said were even more vital in the middle of a pandemic.

“You’re not getting back at the police officer that tragically killed George Floyd by looting a town,” Mr. Frey said. “You’re not getting back at anybody.”

Credit…Darnella Frazier, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

In the year before George Floyd and the police officer now charged with his death, Derek Chauvin, encountered each other on a Minneapolis street, they had worked at the same Latin nightclub. But it was the minutes leading up to Mr. Floyd’s death, as he was pinned on the ground, that the authorities are racing to understand.

In a move that has since prompted protests in cities across the country, Mr. Chauvin knelt down on Mr. Floyd behind a police vehicle outside the store. For eight minutes and 46 seconds, according to a criminal complaint filed on Friday by the Hennepin County attorney, the police officer pressed his knee into Mr. Floyd’s neck in silence, staring toward the ground as his captive gasped repeatedly that he could not breathe.

Bystanders waved their cellphones, cursed and pleaded for help, and still, for two minutes and 53 seconds after Mr. Floyd had stopped protesting and became unresponsive, the officer continued to kneel.

The fatal encounter began just before 8 p.m. on Monday, when Mr. Floyd entered Cup Foods and a store clerk claimed that he had paid for cigarettes with a counterfeit $20 bill. In the minutes that followed, Mr. Floyd found himself on the ground, beneath the officer’s knee. He called, records say, for his mother. He said, “Please.”

One of the officers dismissed his pleas that he could not breathe.

“You are talking fine,” one officer said, according to the charging documents.

At least one officer was worried: That officer asked if they should roll Mr. Floyd over on his side.

“No, staying put where we got him,” Mr. Chauvin replied.

At 8:24 p.m., Mr. Floyd stopped moving.

Reporting was contributed by Tim Arango, Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, Audra D.S. Burch, Helene Cooper, Manny Fernandez, Thomas Fuller, Matt Furber, Shawn Hubler, Neil MacFarquhar and Frances Robles.

Source: NY times

Related posts

Leave a Comment

%d bloggers like this: