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Home » George Floyd protests LIVE updates: National Guard deployed in New York, LA and Washington as Trump threatens Black Lives Matter demonstrators with US military
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George Floyd protests LIVE updates: National Guard deployed in New York, LA and Washington as Trump threatens Black Lives Matter demonstrators with US military

Top local business leaders have expressed support for the Black Lives Matter movement, saying Australia cannot ignore its own shortcomings on racism and more must be done in the corporate world to promote social justice.

Telstra chief executive Andy Penn, Atlassian’s billionaire co-founder Mike Cannon Brookes, Culture Amp co-founder Didier Elzinga, Salesforce Australia head Pip Marlow and Betashares chief executive Alex Vynokur have all spoken out in response to the death of George Floyd in the United States which has set off the country’s biggest surge of nationwide protests since 1968.

Mike Cannon-Brookes said the scenes from the United States were heart breaking.

Mike Cannon-Brookes said the scenes from the United States were heart breaking. Credit:Renee Nowytarger

“To friends and teammates on the ground; we’re here with you,” Telstra CEO Andy Penn posted on Twitter. “To those back in Australia; we mustn’t allow ourselves to get caught thinking this is only a US-issue.”

Mr Cannon-Brookes also spoke out about what he said was deeply institutionalised racial prejudice and injustice in communities all over the world.

Read the full story here

What began as an attempt by two music insiders to pause business as usual across the industry on Tuesday, in response to the protests sweeping the nation, broadened and morphed overnight on social media into a less focused action, resulting in a sea of black boxes across Instagram and other platforms.

Baker Boy matched his post with a strong plea urging his fans to take their “activism further than your social media”.

Baker Boy matched his post with a strong plea urging his fans to take their “activism further than your social media”.Credit:Dean Sewell

Brands including Spotify, Live Nation, Apple, TikTok and many of the largest record companies said on Monday that they would cease most operations the following day, in light of the demonstrations sparked by the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

The industry blackout initiative, which started under the hashtag, #TheShowMustBePaused, was the brainchild of two black women who work in music marketing, Jamila Thomas and Brianna Agyemang.

Read the full story here

Police in Istanbul have dispersed a small group of demonstrators who gathered in the Turkish city to denounce police violence and to stand in solidarity with protesters in the United States. At least 29 demonstrators were detained, Turkey’s state-run agency reported.

Anadolu Agency said riot police broke up the demonstration in Istanbul’s Kadikoy district late Tuesday after the group of about 50 activists ignored calls to disperse.

Some of the anti-police violence activists were seen carrying a poster of George Floyd, who died after a white Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee against Floyd’s neck while the handcuffed black man called out that he couldn’t breathe.

Floyd’s death on May 25 sparked protests that spread across the U.S. and beyond.

Turkish authorities frequently impose bans on public demonstrations or gatherings on security grounds. Human rights groups often accuse police of using disproportionate force to break up demonstrations.

AP

Le Pecq: Three days after George Floyd died with a Minneapolis police officer choking off his air, another black man writhed on a street in Paris as a police officer knelt on his neck during an arrest.

Immobilisation techniques where officers apply pressure with their knees on prone suspects are used in policing around the world and have long drawn criticism.

One reason why Floyd’s death is sparking anger and touching nerves globally is that such techniques have been blamed for asphyxiations and other deaths in police custody beyond American shores, often involving non-white suspects.

“We cannot say that the American situation is foreign to us,” said French lawmaker Francois Ruffin, who has pushed for a ban on the police use of face-down holds that are implicated in multiple deaths in France, a parliamentary effort put on hold by the coronavirus pandemic.

The muscular arrest on May 28 in Paris of a black man who was momentarily immobilised face-up with an officer’s knee and upper shin pressing down on his jaw, neck and upper chest is among those that have drawn angry comparisons with the killing of Floyd on May 25 in Minneapolis.

Read the full story here

Pope Francis has broken his silence on the unrest in the United States, saying no one can “turn a blind eye to racism and exclusion” but condemning violence as “self-destructive and self-defeating.”

Francis, who dedicated the entire English-language section of his weekly audience to the US situation, implored God for national reconciliation and peace.

Pope Francis on Easter Sunday.

Pope Francis on Easter Sunday.Credit:AFP

He called the death of George Floyd tragic, and said he was praying for him and all those who had been killed as a result of the “sin of racism”.

Floyd, an African American, died after a Minneapolis police officer held his knee on his neck for several minutes.

AP

Chicago: In the days since US President Donald Trump blamed antifa activists for an eruption of violence at protests over police killings of black people, social media has lit up with false rumours that the far-left-leaning “group” is transporting people to wreak havoc on small cities across America.

The false rumours are part of a wave of hoaxes, conspiracy theories and other falsehoods surging on social media following George Floyd’s death in police custody in Minneapolis.

A poster with the inscription 'Justice for George' and 'Antifa on the offensive' is held by a protester demonstrating against police brutality.

A poster with the inscription ‘Justice for George’ and ‘Antifa on the offensive’ is held by a protester demonstrating against police brutality.Credit:DPA

Among them are claims that Floyd is not really dead and that billionaire philanthropist George Soros is bringing in protesters on convoys of buses, and supplying them with bricks.

Many viral posts misrepresent historical events, often falsely claiming they relate to the current wave of protests. One shared hundreds of thousands of times carries a caption claiming it shows a black man who is actually an FBI agent being arrested. The video dates from 2019 and the man being briefly detained in the video is not an FBI agent.

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Netflix Australia has encouraged viewers to turn off the streaming service tonight to watch the National Indigenous Television (NITV) program The Point instead.

“Like many Aussies, we’re keen to educate ourselves more about racism, both overseas and at home,” Netflix Australia wrote on Facebook.

“If you want to know why the Black Lives Matter protests have resonated with Indigenous Australians, switch off Netflix tonight and watch The Point on NITV from 8.30pm AEST.”

The Point is a weekly hour-long panel hosted by Rachael Hocking and John Paul Janke telling stories from remote and regional Australia.

The program is on NITV, part of SBS, every Wednesday night.

NITV has welcomed the post from Netflix Australia, which had around 5,200 Facebook reactions and hundreds of comments in 45 minutes.

Top local business leaders have expressed support for the Black Lives Matter movement, saying Australia cannot ignore its own shortcomings on racism and more must be done in the corporate world to promote social justice.

Telstra chief executive Andy Penn, Atlassian’s billionaire co-founder Mike Cannon Brookes, Culture Amp co-founder Didier Elzinga, Salesforce Australia head Pip Marlow and Betashares chief executive Alex Vynokur have all spoken out in response to the death of George Floyd in the United States which has set off the country’s biggest surge of nationwide protests since 1968.

Mike Cannon-Brookes said the scenes from the United States were heart breaking.

Mike Cannon-Brookes said the scenes from the United States were heart breaking. Credit:Renee Nowytarger

“To friends and teammates on the ground; we’re here with you,” Telstra CEO Andy Penn posted on Twitter. “To those back in Australia; we mustn’t allow ourselves to get caught thinking this is only a US-issue.”

Mr Cannon-Brookes also spoke out about what he said was deeply institutionalised racial prejudice and injustice in communities all over the world.

Read the full story here

When the Arab Spring kicked off in 2010, commentators hailed social media as the great leveller, a radical new technology that could amplify voices, aid organising and connect people.

Demonstrators gather in Washington on Tuesday to protest after the death of George Floyd. It was the largest crowd to protest in the capital since his death.

Demonstrators gather in Washington on Tuesday to protest after the death of George Floyd. It was the largest crowd to protest in the capital since his death. Credit:AP

The debate is still raging over how instrumental Twitter and Facebook really were in that era. But anyone watching social media over the past week would see it is still a major tool for organisers and supporters of protests.

As protests following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis spread around the world, videos and images of police brutality, looting and rioting were uploaded instantaneously. After a decade of misinformation scandals and allegations of radicalising and endangering users, some see the latest civil unrest as offering social media firms a return to the role they were praised for during the Arab Spring.

But in 2020, the online platforms are more complicated than a decade ago. The services have become ideological battlegrounds, with state actors, political groups, conspiracy theorists and campaigners all pushing their own agendas.

Read the full piece here

Philadelphia: Voters navigated curfews and health concerns in a slate of primary contests on Tuesday that tested the nation’s ability to host elections amid duelling crises and moved Joe Biden closer to formally clinching the Democratic presidential nomination.

In all, nine states and the District of Columbia held elections, including four that delayed their April contests because of the coronavirus outbreak. With no real competition, Biden and President Donald Trump easily won their respective primary elections in Indiana, Rhode Island, Maryland and the night’s biggest prize: Pennsylvania. Biden also won South Dakota.

An election official helps voters at a polling station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US.

An election official helps voters at a polling station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, US. Credit:Bloomberg

Washington, DC, and Pennsylvania were rocked by protests following the police killing of George Floyd. The dynamic was especially intense in Washington, where voters reported waiting hours in line to cast their ballots.

While D.C. officials said voters wouldn’t be arrested for breaking the 7pm curfew, thousands of protesters clogged key areas around the district, setting up a potential clash with law enforcement agencies and National Guard troops during a fifth night of social unrest.

Read the full story here

Amsterdam: Images of a white police officer kneeling on the neck of African-American George Floyd, who then died, have sparked protests from Amsterdam to Nairobi, but they also expose deeper grievances among demonstrators over strained race relations in their own countries.

With violent clashes between protesters and authorities raging in the United States, anti-police-brutality activists gathered by the thousands in support of the Black Lives Matter movement in various European and African cities.

People take part in a Black Lives Matter protest in front of the Royal Palace on Dam Square in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

People take part in a Black Lives Matter protest in front of the Royal Palace on Dam Square in Amsterdam, Netherlands.Credit:AP

Peaceful protesters highlighted allegations of abuse of black prisoners by their jailers, social and economic inequality, and institutional racism lingering from the colonial pasts of the Netherlands, Britain and France.

“If you want to believe that we in the Netherlands do not have a problem with race, you should go ahead and go home,” Jennifer Tosch, founder of Black Heritage Amsterdam Tours, told a crowd in Amsterdam, from where the Dutch West India Company operated ships estimated to have traded 500,000 slaves in the 1600s and 1700s.

Tosch and others drew a comparison between Floyd’s death and the treatment of slaves centuries ago. “We have seen this image before as white persecutors and enslavers held down the enslaved and branded them with an iron.”

Read the full story here

Source: Sydney Morning Herald

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