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Gunmen linked to El Chapo’s cartel leaves body of man in the middle of the road with warning sign

A gang linked to Joaquín ‘El Chapo‘ Guzmán’s cartel placed the body of a dead man in a wheelchair along with a warning for a rival organization operated by one of the drug lord’s featured in the hit Netflix series, Narcos: Mexico.

Authorities in the northern Mexican state of Sonora responded to a call Saturday and found the victim’s remains covered in a blanket with a message for Rafael Caro Quintero’s Caborca Cartel.

Local media outlets reported the man was kidnapped Friday and stabbed. 

The killing, which was claimed by Los Salazar, was in retribution for La Barredora 24/7 attacking and extorting people in Caborca. It is unknown if the victim was a member of the gang.

The cartel is an armed wing of Caro Quintero’s syndicate.

‘All of these bosses with La Barredora 24/7 are the same ones who have been kidnapping and extorting our farmers, cattle breeders and merchants in Caborca and its communal lands,’ the threat read.

The identity of the victim was not released by authorities. No arrests have been reported. It’s not clear what his relation to Quintero’s cartel is.

On Saturday, police in the northern Mexican state of Sonora discovered the body of a dead man who was kidnapped a day earlier and stabbed dead by members of Los Salazar, a gang tied to the Sinaloa Cartel

On Saturday, police in the northern Mexican state of Sonora discovered the body of a dead man who was kidnapped a day earlier and stabbed dead by members of Los Salazar, a gang tied to the Sinaloa Cartel

On Saturday, police in the northern Mexican state of Sonora discovered the body of a dead man who was kidnapped a day earlier and stabbed dead by members of Los Salazar, a gang tied to the Sinaloa Cartel

A gang linked to Joaquín 'El Chapo' Guzmán's cartel placed the body of a dead man in a wheelchair along with a warning for a rival organization operated by one of the drug lord's featured in the hit Netflix series, Narcos: Mexico

A gang linked to Joaquín 'El Chapo' Guzmán's cartel placed the body of a dead man in a wheelchair along with a warning for a rival organization operated by one of the drug lord's featured in the hit Netflix series, Narcos: Mexico

A gang linked to Joaquín ‘El Chapo’ Guzmán’s cartel placed the body of a dead man in a wheelchair along with a warning for a rival organization operated by one of the drug lord’s featured in the hit Netflix series, Narcos: Mexico

Rafael Caro Quintero, one of founders of the defunct Guadalajara Cartel's and whose life is portrayed in Netflix's Narcos: Mexico, is being targeted by Joaquín 'El Chapo' Guzmán's three sons, who have taken over the reigns of the Sinaloa Cartel. Caro Quintero's Caborca Cartel is known to be operating out of Caborca, Sonora, about 90 miles from the Mexico-California border

Rafael Caro Quintero, one of founders of the defunct Guadalajara Cartel's and whose life is portrayed in Netflix's Narcos: Mexico, is being targeted by Joaquín 'El Chapo' Guzmán's three sons, who have taken over the reigns of the Sinaloa Cartel. Caro Quintero's Caborca Cartel is known to be operating out of Caborca, Sonora, about 90 miles from the Mexico-California border

Rafael Caro Quintero, one of founders of the defunct Guadalajara Cartel’s and whose life is portrayed in Netflix’s Narcos: Mexico, is being targeted by Joaquín ‘El Chapo’ Guzmán’s three sons, who have taken over the reigns of the Sinaloa Cartel. Caro Quintero’s Caborca Cartel is known to be operating out of Caborca, Sonora, about 90 miles from the Mexico-California border

The latest killing comes after the mayors of Caborca and Pitiquito called on the government for additional help in combating the ongoing drug turf battle, according to Diario Mexico.

‘We request once again the support of the federal and state governments so that what is conducive to the restoration of peace and tranquility in our region is carried out through the various forces of order,’ the joint statement read.

‘Citizens demand from us every right to the security that corresponds to them and that they feel has been taken from them. We recognize the joint efforts that at the moment have been carried out by the various agencies, however the public perception demands greater results.’

Caro Quintero has been at odds with El Chapo’s three sons, Jesús Alfredo Guzmán, Iván Archivaldo and Ovidio Guzmán López, known as Los Chapitos, who have been tasked with keeping the Sinaloa Cartel’s day-to-day operations afloat while their father serves a life sentence at super maximum security jail in the United States.

Joaquín 'El Chapo' Guzmán (center) came up through the ranks of the defunct Guadalajara Cartel before going on his own and co-founding the Sinaloa Cartel

Joaquín 'El Chapo' Guzmán (center) came up through the ranks of the defunct Guadalajara Cartel before going on his own and co-founding the Sinaloa Cartel

Joaquín ‘El Chapo’ Guzmán (center) came up through the ranks of the defunct Guadalajara Cartel before going on his own and co-founding the Sinaloa Cartel

Ovidio Guzmán

Ovidio Guzmán

Iván Archivaldo Guzmán

Iván Archivaldo Guzmán

An armed group known as Los Salazar, which is tied to the sons of El Chapo, Ovidio Guzmán  (left),  Iván Archivaldo Guzmán (right) Jesús Alfredo Guzmán, has launched another attack to drive out the Caborca Cartel, founded by Rafael Caro Quintero, who is featured in Netflix’s Narcos: Mexico

Hundreds have been left dead as a result of clashes between the 68-year-old’s cartel and the son’s of one of his former underlings with the Guadalajara Cartel, whose storied rise and fall was well documented in the Netflix series. 

In June, Los Salazar kidnapped 10 men, including a professor who was mistakenly identified, and dumped their dead bodies on a highway stretch that connects the cities of Caborca and Sonoyta – about 90 miles south of the Mexico-California border.

Caro Quintero was the subject of  Drug Enforcement Administration investigation after agents tipped the Mexican military, leading to the raid of a 2,500 acre marijuana farm.

The Guadalajara Cartel blamed DEA agent Enrique ‘Kiki’ Camarena for the bust, and decided to retaliate. 

Caro Quintero and the two other cartel leaders, Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo and Ernesto Fonseca Carrillo, ordered the kidnapping of the 37-year-old Camarena in broad daylight on February 7, 1985.  

Camarena’s body was found wrapped in plastic and dumped in La Angostura, Michoacán, on March 5, 1985.  

Quintero eventually fled to Costa Rica with his girlfriend and was arrested April 4, 1985 and was later sentenced to 40 years in jail for Camarena’s murder.

On August 9, 2013, a Jalisco court ordered the release of Quintero, after he had served 28 years in prison, because he had been improperly tried for the killing of the DEA special agent. But on August 14, a federal court acted on pressure from the United States and issued a warrant for Quintero’s arrest.

Source: Daily Mail

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