School districts are reporting surges in violence among students since classes returned from Covid lockdowns. One expert blamed the disruptions to daily life caused by the pandemic (file photo)
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EXCLUSIVE: Violence in schools is increasing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic disrupting children’s lives – and the main solution could be changing culture in the home, expert says

  • Dr Adolph Brown, a clinical psychologist, says that a recent uptick in violence in schools is a result of disruptions in life caused by Covid
  • The solution, he says, lies in the home where parents should teach their children proper conflict management skills
  • He says that blaming movies, TV and video games are just a way to push blame away from issues that lie in the home
  • By teaching children to handle things non-violently, you are helping both your child and others in the community, he says 

Violence in schools is rising, and one expert is pointing to the pandemic destroying the structure of children’s lives as the reason – and believes the solution lies in the household.

Dr Adolph Brown, a clinical psychologist, told DailyMail.com that more children are acting out in violence now than in previous years because of a multitude of issues – with many stemming from pandemic related anxieties and disruptions of life.

The solutions lie in the home, he says, as he believes better positive displays of behavior from parents and other authority figures will show children how to act properly and how to respond to adversity in a controlled manner.

School closures and cancellations of many extra-curricular activities during the pandemic led to a spike in pediatric mental health issues, and in turn is fueling a trend of more fights and other acts of violence in schools around America.

School districts are reporting surges in violence among students since classes returned from Covid lockdowns. One expert blamed the disruptions to daily life caused by the pandemic (file photo)

School districts are reporting surges in violence among students since classes returned from Covid lockdowns. One expert blamed the disruptions to daily life caused by the pandemic (file photo)

Multiple independent school districts have reported experiencing more violent acts since schools reopened after pandemic-inflicted lockdowns.

There is little national tracking of violence in schools and studies compiling the data may take years, meaning the exact level of this disturbing rise has not yet been quantified.

Many principals and superintendents around America are warning of the trend of increased student-on-student and event student-on-faculty violence. 

‘There was violence in our schools long before the pandemic, however what the pandemic did to students in America, is it de-structured most of their support systems,’ Brown explained to DailyMail.com.

‘When that removed from young peoples lives it becomes isolating, it becomes emotional for them.’

Dr Adolph Brown (pictured), a clinical psychologist, told DailyMail.com that stopping an increase in youth violence starts in the home

Dr Adolph Brown (pictured), a clinical psychologist, told DailyMail.com that stopping an increase in youth violence starts in the home

Brown is a father of eight children himself, all now between the ages of 20 and 33. He said that he made sure to raise them properly not only for their own sake but for his community at large. 

He said this surge in emotions is leading to many acting out. Parents and guardians can set a positive example in the home, though.

Brown says that parents need to avoid acting out and instead control their emotions. Avoid using swear words, yelling, and hitting. By doing so, parents are teaching their children that these are appropriate ways to act.

He says that teaching conflict resolution skill is important as well. Conflict will always occur, and parents should use those moments as opportunities to teach health, safe, strategies to children.

Many in the past have pointed to media like TV, movies and video games for teaching improper behavior, but he believes that those are just distractions from the real issue, culture at home.

‘What if we focused more on getting our own houses together,’ he said about those that point to outward factors.

By doing so, it can also instill more trust in a community and spur other parents to raise their children properly as well.

If a parent can trust that other kids will not be violent towards their own child, he explains, then they will teach their child not to be violent to others either.

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