Internewscast
Image default
News World News

Horrifying maps reveal Australian suburbs worst hit by the coronavirus 

Australia’s coronavirus hotspots have been laid bare in alarming maps showing which areas have been worst affected by the pandemic, as the national infection count climbs to 2,806. 

Waverley, which includes Bondi, Bronte and Queens Park in Sydney’s eastern suburbs, leads all areas in New South Wales with 105 recorded cases of COVID-19.

Stonnington Council in Melbourne – which presides over lush inner-city suburbs including Toorak, Prahran and South Yarra –  was the highest in Victoria with 57 infections. 

Central Sydney, Woollahra, Waverley and the city's northern beaches have been revealed as hotspots for the coronavirus in New South Wales. The virus has infected more than 1,200 people across the state

Central Sydney, Woollahra, Waverley and the city's northern beaches have been revealed as hotspots for the coronavirus in New South Wales. The virus has infected more than 1,200 people across the state

Central Sydney, Woollahra, Waverley and the city’s northern beaches have been revealed as hotspots for the coronavirus in New South Wales. The virus has infected more than 1,200 people across the state

Sydney's northern beaches is in the top five areas for infections in New South Wales with 68 recorded coronavirus cases

Sydney's northern beaches is in the top five areas for infections in New South Wales with 68 recorded coronavirus cases

Sydney’s northern beaches is in the top five areas for infections in New South Wales with 68 recorded coronavirus cases

The Waverley count would include the ‘several’ backpackers who tested positive to the respiratory illness in the Bondi area between Friday and Sunday of last week.  

Other clusters of cases in and around Australia’s two biggest cities are the Mornington Peninsula south-east of Melbourne with 36 infections and Sydney’s northern beaches with 68.

NSW’s Central Coast, Woollahra and central Sydney also feature in the top five most infected areas of the state. 

Central Melbourne, Booroondara and Glen Eira in the city’s eastern suburbs sit in third, fourth and fifth place in Victoria. 

Broader data of positive coronavirus cases in Sydney show 319 people in the city’s southeast have contracted COVID-19, while there are 247 cases in the city’s north. 

Sydney’s west and south west have 98 and 88 cases respectively, while the Hunter New England region has 117.

Of the state’s cases, seven people have died and 16 are currently in intensive care.  

Pictured Sorrento on Melbourne's Mornington Peninsula. The southern side of the peninsula has emerged as one of Australia's coronavirus hotspots with 36 cases

Pictured Sorrento on Melbourne's Mornington Peninsula. The southern side of the peninsula has emerged as one of Australia's coronavirus hotspots with 36 cases

 Pictured Sorrento on Melbourne’s Mornington Peninsula. The southern side of the peninsula has emerged as one of Australia’s coronavirus hotspots with 36 cases

THE COUNCILS WITH THE MOST CASES

New South Wales 

Waverley – 105

Sydney – 69

Northern Beaches – 68

Woollahra – 66

Central Coast – 44

Canterbury-Bankstown – 41

Sutherland Shire – 35

Ryde – 33

Randwick – 32

Hornsby – 31

Blacktown – 30

Inner West – 29

 Ku-ring-gai – 28

Newcastle – 26

Penrith – 25

 Victoria

 Stonnington – 57

Mornington Peninsula – 36

Melbourne – 32

Boroondara – 29

Glen Eira – 26

Port Phillip – 25

Moreland – 23

Greater Geelong – 21

Bayside – 17

Banyule – 16

Casey – 16

Yarra Ranges – 15

Wyndham – 14

Monash – 13

Moonee Valley – 13

Source: NSW Health and Victoria’s Department of Health and Human Services

Some of the cases involving the Bondi backpackers came from two parties at the Boogie Wonderland at the Bucket List Bondi on March 15, and a party at Club 77 on the same date.

The new cases in tourists came a day after Scott Morrison was forced to close the iconic beach when thousands of sunseekers ignored social distancing measures. 

Chief health officer Dr Kerry Chant on Thursday morning said an additional 190 people had tested positive in NSW since 8pm on Wednesday. 

Sydney's south east has the most confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 319 people in the area catching the deadly virus

Sydney's south east has the most confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 319 people in the area catching the deadly virus

Sydney’s south east has the most confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 319 people in the area catching the deadly virus

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian praised people for ‘stepping up and following the various decision we have had to take in the last few days regarding shutdowns’.

‘But I do also want to say to the community that if we don’t see things shifting in the numbers because of those actions, NSW will have to go further,’ she said. 

‘NSW is different to the other states. If I feel the curve is not going the way we want it to, I will go further in NSW, there will be further shutdowns.’ 

Dr Chant said she was expecting the state’s number of infections to continue rising due to Australians returning from overseas. 

New South Wales is the hardest hit state, with coronavirus cases surging by 190 overnight 

‘We’ll be particularly looking at those cases where we don’t find any links to either overseas travel or known clusters or other confirmed cases,’ she said.

‘And that will give us an indication of the success of the strategies.’

Meanwhile three people in their 70s have died from COVID-19 in Victoria, as the state’s total number of confirmed cases has also risen to 520. 

Another man in his 70s has died in Western Australia from the disease.  

Their deaths comes after a 68-year-old cruise ship passenger died from COVID-19 on Wednesday.

Several backpackers based in Bondi, in Sydney's east, tested positive to COVID-19 between Friday and Sunday. Pictured: thousands ignoring social distancing on Bondi Beach last Friday

Several backpackers based in Bondi, in Sydney's east, tested positive to COVID-19 between Friday and Sunday. Pictured: thousands ignoring social distancing on Bondi Beach last Friday

Several backpackers based in Bondi, in Sydney’s east, tested positive to COVID-19 between Friday and Sunday. Pictured: thousands ignoring social distancing on Bondi Beach last Friday

CORONA-THEMED TATTOOS ABOUT TOILET PAPER AND STAYING HOME GO VIRAL 

Foreign backpackers have been ignoring strict coronavirus self-isolation orders, stepping off their international flights and rushing out to get tattoos.

Local customers also flocked to tattoo studios on the last night they could get themselves inked in Australia but few wanted a permanent reminder of COVID-19.

All tattoo parlours were forced to cease trading at midnight on Thursday under the same health regulations that shut down businesses including tanning, waxing and nail salons.

Quarantine has been one theme of COVID-19 tattoos. Despite warnings to international visitors that they must self-isolate for 14 days after arriving in Australia, backpackers have been reported to be going straight from the airport to get a tattoo

Quarantine has been one theme of COVID-19 tattoos. Despite warnings to international visitors that they must self-isolate for 14 days after arriving in Australia, backpackers have been reported to be going straight from the airport to get a tattoo

Quarantine has been one theme of COVID-19 tattoos. Despite warnings to international visitors that they must self-isolate for 14 days after arriving in Australia, backpackers have been reported to be going straight from the airport to get a tattoo 

Rather than being inundated with new patrons, some studios reported a surge in regular clients, many of whom wanted to complete half-finished jobs.

Most last-minute customers were not asking for Corona bottles or other COVID-19 mementos but Instagram is already filled with tattoos featuring those themes.

Owners had no idea when they would be able to reopen, with workers at one studio considering whether they should donate its medical supplies to a hospital. 

Vic Market Tattoo Shop in Melbourne’s CBD, which has seven artists including Wade Johnston, closed on Monday ahead of the ban.

Toilet paper rolls appear regularly in coronavirus tattoos. Local tattooist said most of their customers on the last legal day of trading did not want a reminder of the deadly virus

Toilet paper rolls appear regularly in coronavirus tattoos. Local tattooist said most of their customers on the last legal day of trading did not want a reminder of the deadly virus

Toilet paper rolls appear regularly in coronavirus tattoos. Local tattooist said most of their customers on the last legal day of trading did not want a reminder of the deadly virus 

‘The main issue that we all ran into was new tourists wanting to get tattooed,’ Mr Johnston said.

‘We had at least five separate cases of backpackers who had just gotten off international flights wanting to get tattooed, obviously ignoring self-isolation guidelines.’

All foreign nationals who arrived in Australia before 9pm last Friday have been ordered to self-isolate for 14 days.

Coronavirus tattoos have been appearing since the outbreak of the disease became global news

Coronavirus tattoos have been appearing since the outbreak of the disease became global news

Corona beer bottles have been a popular coronavirus tattoo

Corona beer bottles have been a popular coronavirus tattoo

Coronavirus tattoos have been appearing since the outbreak of the disease became global news. Corona beer bottles have been a popular COVID-19

After that time only Australian citizens, residents and immediate families have been allowed to enter the country.

Like other studio operators Mr Johnston said the Australian tattoo industry was already highly regulated and followed safe cross-contamination practices.

‘So I’d say the industry, as a whole, takes this pretty seriously.’

This studio had tourists wanting tattoos when they should be in quarantine. 'We had at least five separate cases of backpackers who had just gotten off international flights wanting to get tattooed, obviously ignoring self isolation guidelines,' artist Wade Johnston said

This studio had tourists wanting tattoos when they should be in quarantine. 'We had at least five separate cases of backpackers who had just gotten off international flights wanting to get tattooed, obviously ignoring self isolation guidelines,' artist Wade Johnston said

This studio had tourists wanting tattoos when they should be in quarantine. ‘We had at least five separate cases of backpackers who had just gotten off international flights wanting to get tattooed, obviously ignoring self isolation guidelines,’ artist Wade Johnston said

Jamie Kirchen, who owns Hunter and Fox Tattoo at Beaconsfield in Sydney’s inner southern suburbs, said he faced Wednesday night with a ‘heavy heart’.

‘I didn’t get home to my family until 1.30am as I live on the south coast and chose to tattoo until I could,’ Mr Kirchen said.

‘All our artists managed to stay until cut-off time last night, fitting in our loyal customers before we had to close the doors.’

Surviving the deadly COVID-19 threat crops up in coronavirus tattoos

Surviving the deadly COVID-19 threat crops up in coronavirus tattoos

This tattoo shows the virus as the sun behind a palm tree above the word 'coronafornia'

This tattoo shows the virus as the sun behind a palm tree above the word 'coronafornia'

Surviving the deadly COVID-19 threat crops up in coronavirus tattoos (left). Another tattoo shows the virus as the sun behind a palm tree above the word ‘coronafornia’ (right)

Mr Kirchen, who had been tattooing for 11 years, was grateful to his staff for ‘sticking tight and smashing out two days worth of work in one.’

‘This is our livelihood. I have kids to feed and a mortgage to pay, without work this will be tricky so it was a bittersweet night.

‘It was great to see our clients flocking in to get their appointments met before we shut down but a sickening feeling for the unknown.

‘Our adrenaline was pumping the whole time, posting on social media to get clients in before 12am – emails, phone calls – but at the same time trying to limit crowds by adhering to one person per every four square metres.’

Garry Kirstenfeldt was on board a Royal Caribbean’s Voyager of the Seas that docked in Sydney on March 18.

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA: 2,751

New South Wales: 1,219

Victoria: 520

Queensland: 493

Western Australia: 231

South Australia: 235

Australian Capital Territory: 53

Tasmania: 47 

Northern Territory: 8

TOTAL CASES:  2,806 

DEAD: 13

He died in Toowoomba Hospital in Queensland, where he was being treated in intensive care, on Wednesday afternoon.

Queensland Health confirmed the man’s death on Wednesday evening and said he had ‘serious underlying medical condition before contracting the virus.’  

Ms Berejiklian said police will be ramping up their presence around Sydney’s ports as well as in regional and rural areas.

‘Nobody will be getting off a ship until further notice. I don’t want any action taken releasing passengers off boats in Sydney until all authorities have ticked it off,’ she said on Thursday morning.

‘We are telling people not to be overly concerned or panicked but just to know that the NSW government will go further if we have to because it is in the interests of public safety.’

Officers from Thursday will have the power to issue fines of $1000 to individuals and $5000 to businesses that breach public health orders or ministerial directions.

People in the firing line include returned travellers who contravene the requirement to self-quarantine for 14 days and those diagnosed with COVID-19 who similarly don’t follow the rules. 

Federal border authorities have blamed NSW Health for the Ruby Princess cruise ship fiasco, where infected passengers were allowed into Sydney before test results were known. 

Garry Kirstenfeldt, 68, died from COVID-19 on Wednesday. He was on board a Royal Caribbean's Voyager of the Seas that docked in Sydney on March 18

Garry Kirstenfeldt, 68, died from COVID-19 on Wednesday. He was on board a Royal Caribbean's Voyager of the Seas that docked in Sydney on March 18

Garry Kirstenfeldt, 68, died from COVID-19 on Wednesday. He was on board a Royal Caribbean’s Voyager of the Seas that docked in Sydney on March 18 

 

 

Source: dailymail UK

Related posts

Leave a Comment