HomeNewsAUAustralians will now have to register their kid-friendly NERF guns as firearms...

Australians will now have to register their kid-friendly NERF guns as firearms in South Australia

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Nerf guns will now be registered as FIREARMS in one Australian state because they look identical to a prohibited weapon

  • South Australians may need to register some models of Nerf guns as firearms
  • Popular children’s toy found to fire the same way as prohibited gel blasters 
  • Gel blaster owners called rules frustrating as could be charged for buying a toy

A popular children’s toy has been exposed as a hidden firearm after some models may now be registered as weapons in one Australian state.  

Nerf guns will now be registered as firearms in South Australia after enthusiasts discovered that certain designs of the child-friendly toy operate identically to prohibited gel blasters. 

The gel blasters – toy guns that generally shoot a super-absorbent polymer as bullets – are considered a ‘regulated imitation firearm’ under the South Australian Firearms Act. 




Some models of popular children toys Nerf guns (pictured) will need to be registered as firearms as they operate identically to prohibited gel blasters in South Australia

Some models of popular children toys Nerf guns (pictured) will need to be registered as firearms as they operate identically to prohibited gel blasters in South Australia 

Blaster owner Brad Phillips revealed he registered his $35 Nerf Mega Big Shock model (pictured) to his local police station as a firearm

Blaster owner Brad Phillips revealed he registered his $35 Nerf Mega Big Shock model (pictured) to his local police station as a firearm

Since October last year any gel blasters must be registered and the operator must hold a firearms licence – but some Nerf gun models have found a loophole in the legislation. 

Gel blaster owner Brett Herbert said the nerf guns fire in the ‘exact same way’ as a gel shooter. 

‘You can put gels in these things without any modifications and use them as a gel blaster,’ he told 7News.   




Another blaster owner, Brad Phillips, revealed he registered his $35 Nerf Mega Big Shock model to his local police station as a firearm. 

‘It’s only if you load it with a gel ball then you’ll be breaking the law,’ Mr Phillips said. 

Brett Herbert said the legislation is ‘frustrating’ as ‘Blasters’ are seen as participating in a recognised sport in Australia. 

Gel blasters (pictured) are considered a 'regulated imitation firearm' under the South Australian Firearms Act and owners must register the gun and have an operating license

Gel blasters (pictured) are considered a ‘regulated imitation firearm’ under the South Australian Firearms Act and owners must register the gun and have an operating license 

‘There is no logic behind it so we are looking at firearms charges for anyone just going down to the shops to buy a nerf gun’.




Since the six month amnesty period ended in April to surrender any gel blasters, only 460 people have registered their guns.  

SA Police confirmed to Daily Mail Australia that ‘Nerf Blasters are toys and there is no requirement to register any model of nerf blaster’. 

‘During the 6 month gel blaster amnesty 3882 gel blaster firearms were surrendered. No nerf blasters were surrendered as there was no requirement to do so,’ a SA Police spokesperson said. 

‘460 applications were made for new firearms licences and 136 variations to current licences relating to gel blaster firearms. 1522 applications were made to acquire gel blaster firearms.’

SA Police Statement  

Nerf Blasters are toys and there is no requirement to register any model of nerf blaster.




During the 6 month gel blaster amnesty 3882 gel blaster firearms were surrendered. No nerf blasters were surrendered as there was no requirement to do so.

460 applications were made for new firearms licences and 136 variations to current licences relating to gel blaster firearms. 1522 applications were made to acquire gel blaster firearms.

The South Australia Firearms Regulations were amended on 15 April 2021 and gel blaster firearms are now considered paint-ball firearms for the purpose of licencing and regulation and can only be used at licenced venues.

Prior to the Gel Blaster Amnesty SAPOL estimated there was 62,000 gel blasters in the community, but retailers estimated there was more than 350,000 gel blasters circulating in the SA community, however this figure is unable to be verified.

Under the provisions of the South Australia general firearms amnesty gel blasters can be surrendered to police or participating firearms dealers. People are still actively surrendering Gel Blasters.




 

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