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Nothing illustrates why exotic species shouldn’t be introduced to Australia, more than the cane toad.

These poisonous amphibians are found throughout northern Australia, but are actually native to South and Central America.

The large toads were introduced to Queensland in 1935 to control destructive cane beetles in sugarcane crops, but quickly became a pest in their own right.

Highly invasive, they spread rapidly and poisoned anything that tried to eat it.

“Local Indigenous rangers tell stories of birds that fall dead from the sky after eating a tasty cane toad,” WWF says.

“Since their introduction to Australia, they’ve continued to cause local extinctions of native animals, and they’re marching their way across the country.”

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