CDC panel recommends US seniors get souped-up flu vaccines
Share this @internewscast.com

NEW YORK – Americans 65 and older should get newer, souped-up flu vaccines because regular shots don’t provide them enough protection, a federal advisory panel said Wednesday.

The panel unanimously recommended certain flu vaccines that might offer more or longer protection for seniors, whose weakened immune systems don’t respond as well to traditional shots.

Options include: Fluzone High-Dose, Fluad with an immune booster, or Flublok which is made with insect cells instead of chicken eggs.

The panel’s recommendations usually are adopted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and become the government’s guidance for U.S. doctors and their patients. This would be the first time the government has stated a flu vaccine preference for older adults.

U.S. officials currently say that all Americans 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every season.

Flu shots tend to be less effective than other common vaccinations, but they have often been particularly disappointing in seniors. Health officials say there is persuasive research indicating some of the new shots work better in older adults, especially at preventing flu-related hospitalizations. Studies are limited, though, and there’s little research comparing the three new versions.

“These influenza vaccines are better but are not yet the home run that we would love to have,” said panel member Dr. Helen Keipp Talbot of Vanderbilt University,

The new shots have caught on. About 80% of Medicare beneficiaries get the souped-up vaccines each year, mostly the high-dose one, officials said. The new versions can cost roughly three times more than standard flu shots, but they are covered by insurance programs.

Panel members said seniors should get regular flu shots if the newer ones aren’t available.

Also on Wednesday, CDC officials reported the flu vaccine didn’t work all that well this past winter, when most illness were caused by a flu strain that vaccines traditionally do a relatively poor job protecting against. The vaccine was 35% effective in preventing flu symptoms severe enough to require a doctor visit. It was about 44% effective in children, and lower in adults.

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Share this @internewscast.com
You May Also Like

Campus-Town clean-up | WCIA.com

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. (WCIA) Campus-town area will see an increase in city enforcement…

Transcript: Rep. Peter Meijer on “Face the Nation,” Aug. 7, 2022

The following is a transcript of an interview with GOP Rep. Peter…

Toaster dial indicates levels of brownness, not minutes

A viral Instagram post claims the dial on most toasters measures minutes…

Tulsi Gabbard Questions Kamala Harris ‘Hypocrisy’ on Brittney Griner After Prosecuting Marijuana Crimes as California AG

Friday on FNC’s “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” former Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) criticized…

Former President Donald Trump Speaks at CPAC in Dallas

Former President Donald Trump returns to Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in…

YMCA Backpack Attack a success

DECATUR, Ill. (WCIA)– The Decatur YMCA gave out 1,500 bookbags filled with…

Judge BANS release of ‘graphic’ Naomi Judd suicide photos as it would cause family ‘pain’

A judge has sealed the release of Naomi Judd’s ‘graphic’ suicide photos…

Fourth Muslim Man Shot Dead in New Mexico ‘Targeted Killings’ – Crime Online

Four Muslim men have been gunned down since November 2021 in New…