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More than twice as many men are dying from Covid in Queensland than the state’s female residents, leaving medical experts baffled.

The Sunshine State has recorded 171 deaths from coronavirus since the start of the pandemic in early 2020 – with men accounting for 115 fatalities compared to the 56 deaths among women.

While a similar phenomenon has been observed in places like Italy, China and some US states, researchers are no closer to understanding what makes men more at risk.

More than double the number of men are dying from Covid-19 than women in Queensland, leaving medical experts baffled as they struggle to figure out why. Pictured: A couple is seen at a Covid testing clinic in Brisbane

More than double the number of men are dying from Covid-19 than women in Queensland, leaving medical experts baffled as they struggle to figure out why. Pictured: A couple is seen at a Covid testing clinic in Brisbane

More than double the number of men are dying from Covid-19 than women in Queensland, leaving medical experts baffled as they struggle to figure out why. Pictured: A couple is seen at a Covid testing clinic in Brisbane

The Sunshine State has sadly recorded 171 deaths from coronavirus since the start of the pandemic in early 2020 with men accounting for 115 fatalities compared to women at just 56. Pictured: A Covid testing clinic in Brisbane

The Sunshine State has sadly recorded 171 deaths from coronavirus since the start of the pandemic in early 2020 with men accounting for 115 fatalities compared to women at just 56. Pictured: A Covid testing clinic in Brisbane

The Sunshine State has sadly recorded 171 deaths from coronavirus since the start of the pandemic in early 2020 with men accounting for 115 fatalities compared to women at just 56. Pictured: A Covid testing clinic in Brisbane

University of Queensland infectious diseases expert Dr Paul Griffin speculated because men are more likely to suffer from chronic conditions like heart obesity – which are increased morbidity factors for Covid – it may mean they are more vulnerable.

But he said the correlation has ‘not been firmly established’ by the medical community, ABC News reported.

Nigel McMillan, an infectious disease expert at Griffith University has his own theory.

‘We know that the immune systems function differently in men and women, and women tend to have a stronger immune system,’ Professor McMillan said.

‘Females have higher numbers of some of the white blood cells that fight disease and they have increased antibody production.’ 

Researchers in the US, who have seen the strange trend pop up in some states, argue ‘social factors’ and not just biological differences between men and women are likely to be a major underlying reason.

Researchers in the US argue 'social factors' and not just biological differences between men and women are likely to be a major factor. Pictured: A Covid testing clinic in Brisbane

Researchers in the US argue 'social factors' and not just biological differences between men and women are likely to be a major factor. Pictured: A Covid testing clinic in Brisbane

Researchers in the US argue ‘social factors’ and not just biological differences between men and women are likely to be a major factor. Pictured: A Covid testing clinic in Brisbane

A similar phenomenon has been observed in places like Italy, China and some US states, but researchers are no closer to understanding what makes men more at risk. Pictured: A Brisbane Covid vaccination clinic

A similar phenomenon has been observed in places like Italy, China and some US states, but researchers are no closer to understanding what makes men more at risk. Pictured: A Brisbane Covid vaccination clinic

A similar phenomenon has been observed in places like Italy, China and some US states, but researchers are no closer to understanding what makes men more at risk. Pictured: A Brisbane Covid vaccination clinic

A recent study in the Social Science and Medicine Journal found behavioural patterns, underlying health conditions and the type of job a Covid sufferer has may be a large part of the reason why men are dying at a faster rate.

Male-dominated industries like transportation, factories, meatpacking plants, agriculture and construction have suffered higher mortality rates from Covid.

But the answers remain unclear.

‘You can’t attribute observations about things like mortality from a complex disease like Covid and say it’s all biology,’ Sabra Klein, a microbiologist and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Women’s Health, Sex and Gender Research told the New York Times.

‘But I also don’t think you can say it’s all social and it’s all behavioral, either.’

Source: Daily Mail

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