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A history-loving carpet fitter has recreated an ancient machine to solve the mystery of how Stonehenge was built.

Steven Tasker, 66, believes the long-forgotten machinery would have been used to transport the huge stones 180 miles.

He came up with the theory on a visit to Egypt as he wanted to explain how the Pyramids were built.

Steven Tasker, 66, believes the long-forgotten machinery would have been used to transport the huge stones 180 miles

Steven Tasker, 66, believes the long-forgotten machinery would have been used to transport the huge stones 180 miles

Steven Tasker, 66, believes the long-forgotten machinery would have been used to transport the huge stones 180 miles

Steven's theory could explain how stone circles from the Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire were moved to Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire

Steven's theory could explain how stone circles from the Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire were moved to Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire

Steven’s theory could explain how stone circles from the Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire were moved to Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire

Steven estimates the machine would be able to travel 1.5 miles a day - meaning the Stonehenge stones would have taken months to transport

Steven estimates the machine would be able to travel 1.5 miles a day - meaning the Stonehenge stones would have taken months to transport

Steven estimates the machine would be able to travel 1.5 miles a day – meaning the Stonehenge stones would have taken months to transport

Steven decided to build the rocking structure with his grandson to see if they could lift heavy stones.

The mechanism features a circular board in the middle of wooden planks that sit on top of rockers and wooden feet.

Steven, of Llanrhaeadr, Mid Wales, says it could ‘move any weight’ and may solve the Stonehenge mystery.

He said: ‘It may look like something out of Last of the Summer Wine, but we’ve lifted a third of a tonne with it and theoretically it could move any weight.

‘I tied rockers below a plank of wood to try and work out how they could have been used.

‘By using pivot points, I could counterbalance a 60kg roll of carpet on top and by using the rockers, walk it across the road.’

Steven’s theory could explain how stone circles from the Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire were moved to Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire.

He explained his ideas to Dr Campbell Price – curator of one of the UK’s largest Egyptology collections at Manchester Museum.

Dr Price was impressed with his theory and said the ‘efficient movement of large numbers of ancient monuments’ has never been fully explained.

He said: ‘Steve’s experiments give a different perspective into how ancient people were able to plan paths of least resistance, and to manipulate natural forces.’

Steven also believes the machine is referenced in the Old Testament when Ezekiel describes a ‘vision of God being transported on cherubim.’

Steven decided to build the rocking structure with his grandson to see if they could lift heavy stones

Steven decided to build the rocking structure with his grandson to see if they could lift heavy stones

Steven decided to build the rocking structure with his grandson to see if they could lift heavy stones

Steven, of Llanrhaeadr, Mid Wales, says it could 'move any weight' and may solve the Stonehenge mystery

Steven, of Llanrhaeadr, Mid Wales, says it could 'move any weight' and may solve the Stonehenge mystery

Steven, of Llanrhaeadr, Mid Wales, says it could ‘move any weight’ and may solve the Stonehenge mystery

Stephen came up with the theory on a visit to Egypt as he wanted to explain how the Pyramids were built

Stephen came up with the theory on a visit to Egypt as he wanted to explain how the Pyramids were built

Stephen came up with the theory on a visit to Egypt as he wanted to explain how the Pyramids were built

The cherubim includes four wings and ‘feet shaped like the sole of a calf’s foot’.

Steven said: ‘The feet are an important part of the machine because the load’s centre of mass is retained over them.

‘It gives the impression the machine is defying gravity, but like any trick of the eye, a clown leaning forward with his big shoes, it looks like magic.’

Steven estimates the machine would be able to travel 1.5 miles a day – meaning the Stonehenge stones would have taken months to transport.

Engineer Shaun Whitehead, who led the Djedi robotic exploration of the Great Pyramid, said: ‘I’m often approached by people who have their own ideas about why and how these great structures were built.

‘I’m careful not to dismiss any of these without a little thought, but most can be shown to be unworkable or impractical.

‘However, Steven’s theories on how massive objects could have been moved demonstrate a very creative and practical engineering mind.’

Source: Daily Mail

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