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Julian Assange’s wife Stella Moris has made an emotional speech to a crowd outside Belmarsh prison following her wedding to the imprisoned WikiLeaks founder.

She left the high security jail linked arm in arm with her father-in-law wearing the dress designed by Vivienne Westwood. 

Fighting back tears and wearing her wedding dress, she said: ‘I’m very happy but I’m very sad… I wish he were here…

‘What we’re going through is inhuman.’

She added: ‘He’s the most amazing person in the world and he should be free.

‘But our love will carry us through.’.

Mr Assange, 50, who is facing extradition to the United States on espionage charges, married Ms  Moris, 38, in front of four guests and two witnesses this afternoon. Two prison officers attended the ceremony, one of whom acted as official photographer. 

Stella Moris, centre, left HMP Belmarsh with her arms linked with her father-in-law John Shipton, left, and the Wikileaks founder's half-brother Gabriel

Stella Moris, centre, left HMP Belmarsh with her arms linked with her father-in-law John Shipton, left, and the Wikileaks founder's half-brother Gabriel

Stella Moris, centre, left HMP Belmarsh with her arms linked with her father-in-law John Shipton, left, and the Wikileaks founder’s half-brother Gabriel 

Ms Moris addressed supporters of the Wikileaks founder outside the court while cutting the couple's wedding cake

Ms Moris addressed supporters of the Wikileaks founder outside the court while cutting the couple's wedding cake

Ms Moris addressed supporters of the Wikileaks founder outside the court while cutting the couple’s wedding cake 

Ms Moris told the assembled crowd that what she and Mr Assange were going through was 'inhuman'

Ms Moris told the assembled crowd that what she and Mr Assange were going through was 'inhuman'

Ms Moris told the assembled crowd that what she and Mr Assange were going through was ‘inhuman’ 

The couple were allowed to have four guests and two witnesses at the ceremony. Two prison officers attended the wedding, one of whom acted as photographer

The couple were allowed to have four guests and two witnesses at the ceremony. Two prison officers attended the wedding, one of whom acted as photographer

The couple were allowed to have four guests and two witnesses at the ceremony. Two prison officers attended the wedding, one of whom acted as photographer

The former editor and publisher has always denied wrongdoing and has won support from human rights organisations across the globe.

Assange and his new wife, Stella Moris, 38, announced their engagement in November last year.

The couple, who have two children together – Max, two, and Gabriel, four – were wed by a registrar inside the prison shortly after midday.

South African lawyer, Moris, who works for Assange’s legal team, arrived in a fossil grey dress designed by Dame Vivienne Westwood – a vocal supporter of Assange.

She complimented it with a matching longline jacket, a single pink rose attached at the neckline, and a floor-length veil embroidered with words including ‘faith’ and ‘wilfulness’.

Assange, whose parents are of Scottish heritage, reportedly donned a kilt – also designed by Westwood.

The smiling bride clutched a bouquet of pink and purple roses as she was joined at the high-security prison by the couple’s two young sons.

Moris’ mother and Assange’s father, John Shipton, and brother, Gabriel Shipton were also in attendance.

The boys wore matching purple and mustard yellow kilts with white roses attached to their suit jackets. They grinned gleefully as they joined their mother in posing for photographs. 

While the ceremony was destined to be far from ordinary, Assange’s supporters were determined to make the day memorable for the newlyweds. 

Miss Moris poses for photographers before heading into the prison

Stella Moris poses with her sons Gabriel, and Max, left, for the media and supporters, ahead of  her marriage to the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in a small wedding service inside the high-security Belmarsh Prison

Stella Moris poses with her sons Gabriel, and Max, left, for the media and supporters, ahead of  her marriage to the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in a small wedding service inside the high-security Belmarsh Prison

Stella Moris poses with her sons Gabriel, and Max, left, for the media and supporters, ahead of  her marriage to the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in a small wedding service inside the high-security Belmarsh Prison

Stella Moris arrived at the prison with a friend and her mother, right, ahead of her wedding which took place at lunchtime

Stella Moris arrived at the prison with a friend and her mother, right, ahead of her wedding which took place at lunchtime

Stella Moris arrived at the prison with a friend and her mother, right, ahead of her wedding which took place at lunchtime

The blushing bride is helped from her taxi by family before entering the prison for the ceremony

The blushing bride is helped from her taxi by family before entering the prison for the ceremony

The blushing bride is helped from her taxi by family before entering the prison for the ceremony

Miss Moris' extraordinary veil was covered in signatures and brightly coloured handwritten words

Miss Moris' extraordinary veil was covered in signatures and brightly coloured handwritten words

Miss Moris’ extraordinary veil was covered in signatures and brightly coloured handwritten words

A supporter is asked to move back by a police officer as Stella Moris (L), partner of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, arrived in her wedding dress,

A supporter is asked to move back by a police officer as Stella Moris (L), partner of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, arrived in her wedding dress,

A supporter is asked to move back by a police officer as Stella Moris (L), partner of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, arrived in her wedding dress,

Well wishers gathered outside HMP Belmarsh to celebrate the wedding of Stella Moris and Julian Assange

Well wishers gathered outside HMP Belmarsh to celebrate the wedding of Stella Moris and Julian Assange

Well wishers gathered outside HMP Belmarsh to celebrate the wedding of Stella Moris and Julian Assange

A supporter of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holds a placard outside Belmarsh Prison

A supporter of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holds a placard outside Belmarsh Prison

A supporter of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holds a placard outside Belmarsh Prison

A wedding cake brought by supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to celebrate his wedding to fiancee Stella Moris

A wedding cake brought by supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to celebrate his wedding to fiancee Stella Moris

A wedding cake brought by supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to celebrate his wedding to fiancee Stella Moris

A view shows figurines on a wedding cake on the day of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and Stella Moris' wedding at HMP Belmarsh prison. They look remarkably like the couple

A view shows figurines on a wedding cake on the day of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and Stella Moris' wedding at HMP Belmarsh prison. They look remarkably like the couple

A view shows figurines on a wedding cake on the day of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and Stella Moris’ wedding at HMP Belmarsh prison. They look remarkably like the couple

Stella Moris, the partner of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, is photographed with their sons Max, 3, and Gabriel, 4, in her Vivienne Westwood designed wedding dress before driving to Belmarsh Prison

Stella Moris, the partner of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, is photographed with their sons Max, 3, and Gabriel, 4, in her Vivienne Westwood designed wedding dress before driving to Belmarsh Prison

Stella Moris, the partner of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, is photographed with their sons Max, 3, and Gabriel, 4, in her Vivienne Westwood designed wedding dress before driving to Belmarsh Prison

Stella had her two sons with Assange when he was hiding in the Ecuadorian embassy for seven years

Stella had her two sons with Assange when he was hiding in the Ecuadorian embassy for seven years

Stella had her two sons with Assange when he was hiding in the Ecuadorian embassy for seven years

Julian Assange is going to tie the knot with Stella Moris - but there can only be four guests and a prison guard must take the snaps

Julian Assange is going to tie the knot with Stella Moris - but there can only be four guests and a prison guard must take the snaps

Julian Assange is going to tie the knot with Stella Moris – but there can only be four guests and a prison guard must take the snaps

Julian Assange, left, will marry his lawyer Stella Moris, right, later today in Belmarsh Prison

Julian Assange, left, will marry his lawyer Stella Moris, right, later today in Belmarsh Prison

Julian Assange, left, will marry his lawyer Stella Moris, right, later today in Belmarsh Prison 

The atmosphere outside HMP Belmarsh was one of excitement – with Assange’s loyal supporters embracing each other gleefully as they gathered together in celebration.

A gazebo was set up outside the entrance to the prison – displaying a three-tier wedding cake adorned with edible rose petals and bride and groom figures, a white ‘Mrs and Mrs’ sign, and bunches of flowers.

Champagne and canapés were served among the crowd and musical entertainment took place to celebrate the couple’s nuptials.

Assange’s supporters spoke of their joy at the wedding but branded the celebration ‘bittersweet’.

Val, 75, who has been campaigning for Julian’s freedom for the last 12 years said it’s ‘horrendous’ that the couple were forced to marry inside a jail.

She added: ‘They are such a lovely couple and it’s awful that they’re having to get married in Belmarsh – they should be walking down the aisle at the likes of Westminster Abbey not here.

‘It’s horrendous that Stella is going to walk out of that prison on her own.

‘We are here to show her how much she is loved.’

Gloria Wildman, 78, who carried three signs demanding Assange’s release, affectionately referred to the Australian activist as her ‘son.’

She said: ‘I am a mother myself and I see Julian as a son.

‘It’s bittersweet to see them marry in a prison but you can’t lock up love.

‘I wish my son and his beautiful wife great health and happiness, despite the awful circumstances.’

However, the general consensus among the crowds is that Assange’s successful application to marry his fiancée Stella Moris is just a small win in a long list of hurdles awaiting the former editor.

Supporters used the wedding as an opportunity to protest his proposed extradition to the USA. 

Assange and Ms Moris, have two children together, Max (left) and Gabriel (right)

Assange and Ms Moris, have two children together, Max (left) and Gabriel (right)

Assange and Ms Moris, have two children together, Max (left) and Gabriel (right)

Belmarsh's Governor Jenny Louis told the couple's  four guests and two witnesses out of the prison the minute the service was over

Belmarsh's Governor Jenny Louis told the couple's  four guests and two witnesses out of the prison the minute the service was over

Belmarsh’s Governor Jenny Louis told the couple’s  four guests and two witnesses out of the prison the minute the service was over

Julian Assange will NOT be held in a supermax jail if he’s extradited, US assures UK 

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange will not be held in supermax prison conditions if he is allowed to be extradited to the United States, American officials have assured British authorities.

American officials have made the compromise in the hopes of finally ending the lengthy battle to put Assange, 50, on trial for espionage charges in the United States, the Wall Street Journal reported last month.

If Assange is convicted in an American court, U.S. officials have also said the Australian would be allowed to serve jail time in his home country, the outlet reported.

The revelations were made in a court ruling provided by the U.K. Crown Prosecution Service obtained by the outlet. 

Assange has been in London’s high-security Belmarsh Prison since he was arrested in April 2019 for skipping bail seven years earlier during a separate legal battle.

He had spent seven years holed up inside Ecuador’s London embassy, where he fled in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden to face allegations of rape and sexual assault. 

Sweden dropped the sex crimes investigations in November 2019 because so much time had elapsed.

U.S. prosecutors have indicted Assange on 17 espionage charges and one charge of computer misuse over WikiLeaks´ publication of thousands of leaked military and diplomatic documents. 

The charges carry a maximum sentence of 175 years in prison.

The prosecutors say Assange unlawfully helped U.S. Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning steal classified diplomatic cables and military files that WikiLeaks later published. 

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 Dozens of yellow ribbons were tied to the gates of Belmarsh with ‘journalism is not a crime’, ‘free hostage Assange now’ and ‘the world is with Stella Julian’ among the slogans written in marker pen.

Large banners were also tied to the gates and to the traffic lights opposite the jail – with one sign reading ‘beep to free Assange’ gaining the attention of passing motorists who hooted their horns in support.

Gloria added: ‘This is a wasted life. This is a human being. Julian is an innocent man.

‘The first example of this happening is when Jesus was crucified.’

Jim Curran, 75, offered his support to the newly married couple but said he attended the gathering today in protest of extradition – something he has been campaigning against for 44 years – rather than to celebrate their marriage.

He added: ‘I’ve campaigned against Palestinians being extradited to Israel and Kurds being extradited to Turkey.

‘I even campaigned against the extradition of Abu Hamza.

‘Extradition is wrong because every country has different laws and punishments.

‘Some of the fraud offences Julian is being accused of are not even fraud offences in the UK.’

Another supporter, Pete Hall, said he hates the ‘cliches’ of wedding celebrations but felt compelled to share his support for Assange – having spent many years in and out of prison himself.

Describing himself as ‘retired from a life of crime’, he added: ‘The worst thing about prison is that nobody tells you anything.

‘Nobody tells you what will happen to you or what’s going on outside.

‘The only thing I can think of to say to Julian is: hang on, for God’s sake don’t give up.

‘We will get you out eventually.

‘I don’t know how long it will take but please hang on in there.’

Among Assange’s supporters was former British Ambassador Craig Murray.

Murray, 63, donned a green and blue kilt with knee-high cream socks and traditional leather Sporran as he joined supporters gathered to celebrate the couple’s imminent nuptials.

When asked if he would be attending the ceremony, Murray replied: ‘No. I’m too high of a security risk apparently.’

He expressed his dismay at not being able to attend the wedding in person, writing on Twitter: ‘I have the huge honour of being invited by Julian and Stella as one of the six people allowed to attend their wonderful wedding in Belmarsh prison today.

‘But Julian has now been told I will not be allowed in as my presence would ‘endanger the security of the prison’.’

He added: ‘I plainly have superpowers, but this spite and viciousness even on their wedding day is absolutely typical of the cruel yet pathetic British authorities.

‘But most certainly will not spoil the day: we already knew what they are and nothing has changed.

‘The defiant wedding of Julian and Stella today, in the face of a possible 175 years in a US jail for publishing the facts of US war crimes, is a triumph for love, a triumph for hope and a triumph for truth.

‘Let’s celebrate!’

Rather than offering wedding gifts, Assange and Moris asked supporters to put up posters calling for his release or donate to a Crowdfunder campaign – launched by Moris – to help the 50-year-old in his fight against extradition.

They also suggested sponsoring a park bench in honour of the WikiLeaks founder.

However guests were encouraged to dress in formal attire, as they would to attend a normal wedding.

 

 

Timeline: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange’s long legal battle 

2006

Assange creates Wikileaks with a group of like-minded activists and IT experts to provide a secure way for whistleblowers to leak information. He quickly becomes its figurehead and a lightning rod for criticism.

2010

March: U.S. authorities allege Assange engaged in a conspiracy to hack a classified U.S. government computer with former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning. 

July: Wikileaks starts releasing tens of thousands of top secrets documents, including a video of U.S. helicopter pilots gunning down 12 civilians in Baghdad in 2007.  What followed was the release of more than 90,000 classified US military files from the Afghan war and 400,000 from Iraq that included the names of informants. 

August: Two Swedish women claim that they each had consensual sex with Assange in separate instances when he was on a 10-day trip to Stockholm. They allege the sex became non-consensual when Assange refused to wear a condom.

First woman claims Assange was staying at her apartment in Stockholm when he ripped off her clothes. She told police that when she realized Assange was trying to have unprotected sex with her, she demanded he use a condom. She claims he ripped the condom before having sex.

Second Swedish woman claims she had sex with Assange at her apartment in Stockholm and she made him wear a condom. She alleges that she later woke up to find Assange having unprotected sex with her.

He was questioned by police in Stockholm and denied the allegations. Assange was granted permission by Swedish authorities to fly back to the U.K.  

November: A Swedish court ruled that the investigation should be reopened and Assange should be detained for questioning on suspicion of rape, sexual molestation and unlawful coercion. An international arrest warrant is issued by Swedish police through Interpol.

Wikileaks releases its cache of more than 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables.  

December: Assange presents himself to London police and appears at an extradition hearing where he is remanded in custody. Assange is granted conditional bail at the High Court in London after his supporters pay £240,000 in cash and sureties.

2011

February: A British judge rules Assange should be extradited to Sweden but Wikileaks found vows to fight the decision.

April:  A cache of classified U.S. military documents is released by Wikileaks, including intelligence assessments on nearly all of the 779 people who are detained at the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba.

November: Assange loses High Court appeal against the decision to extradite him.

2012

June: Assange enters the Ecuadorian embassy in London requesting political asylum. 

August: Assange is granted political asylum by Ecuador.

2013

June: Assange tells a group of journalists he will not leave the embassy even if sex charges against him are dropped out of fear he will be extradited to the U.S.

2015

August: Swedish prosecutors drop investigation into some of the sex allegations against Assange due to time restrictions. The investigation into suspected rape remains active.

2016

July: Wikileaks begins leaking emails U.S. Democratic Party officials favoring Hillary Clinton.

November: Assange is questioned over the sex allegation at the Ecuadorian Embassy in the presence of Sweden’s assistant prosecutor Ingrid Isgren and police inspector Cecilia Redell. The interview spans two days. 

2017

January: Barack Obama agrees to free whistleblower Chelsea Manning from prison. Her pending release prompts speculation Assange will end his self-imposed exile after Wikileaks tweeted he would agree to U.S. extradition.

April: Lenin Moreno becomes the new president of Ecuador who was known to want to improve diplomatic relations between his country and the U.S. 

May: An investigation into a sex allegation against Assange is suddenly dropped by Swedish prosecutors. 

2018

January: Ecuador confirms it has granted citizenship to Assange following his request. 

February: Assange is visited by Pamela Anderson and Nobel Peace Prize winner Adolfo Perez Esquivel.

March: The Ecuadorian Embassy suspends Assange’s internet access because he wasn’t complying with a promise he made the previous year to ‘not send messages which entailed interference in relation to other states’.

August: U.S. Senate committee asks to interview Assange as part of their investigation into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election.

September: Assange steps down as editor of WikiLeaks.

October: Assange reveals he will launch legal action against the government of Ecuador, accusing it of violating his ‘fundamental rights and freedoms’.

November: U.S. Justice Department inadvertently names Assange in a court document that says he has been charged in secret. 

2019

January: Assange’s lawyers say they are taking action to make President Trump’s administration reveal charges ‘secretly filed’ against him.

April 6: WikiLeaks tweets that a high level Ecuadorian source has told them Assange will be expelled from the embassy within ‘hours or days’. But a senior Ecuadorian official says no decision has been made to remove him from the London building. 

April 11: Assange has his diplomatic asylum revoked by Ecuador and he is arrested by the Metropolitan Police; he is remanded in custody by a judge at Westminster Magistrates Court.

April 12: He is found guilty of breaching his bail terms.

May 1: Sentenced to 11 months in jail.

May 2: Court hearing takes place over Assange’s proposed extradition to the U.S. He tells a court he does not consent to the extradition and the case is adjourned until May 30.

May 13: Swedish prosecutors reopen rape case saying they still want to question Assange. 

June 3: Swedish court rules against detaining him in absentia, setting back the extradition case.

June 12 Home Secretary Sajid Javid signs an extradition request from the US.

June 13 A hearing sets out the date for Assange’s full extradition hearing – February next year.

November  Swedish prosecutors stop investigation into an allegation of rape against Mr Assange 

November 25 – Medics say without correct medical care Assange ‘could die’ in Belmarsh 

December 13 –  Hearing in London hears he is being blocked from seeing key evidence in case

December 19 – Appears at Westminster Magistrates Court via video-link where his lawyer claims US bid to extradite him is ‘political’. 

2020   

February 24 –Assange faces an extradition hearing at Woolwich Crown Court.

Assange’s representatives argue he cannot legally be handed to the US for ‘political offences’ because of a 2003 extradition treaty.

March 2 – Assange appears by video link at Westminster Magistrates Court, where he is refused bail amid the coronavirus crisis.

April 11 – Stella Moris, Assange’s partner, who gave birth to his two children while he was living inside the Ecuadorian embassy, issues a plea for his release amid fears for his health.

June 24 – The US Department of Justice issues an updated 18-count indictment, over Assange’s alleged role in ‘one of the largest compromises of classified information in the history of the United States’.

August 25 – Ms Moris visits her partner in Belmarsh prison for the first time in almost six months.

September 7 – Assange’s extradition hearings resume at the Old Bailey. They are expected to go on for up to four weeks.

October 1 – Judge Vanessa Baraitser adjourned the case at the Old Bailey until January 4. 

2021 

January 4 – Judge Baraitser strikes down US extradition bid. 

August 11 – The US government is authorised to expand its appeal against a judge’s decision not to extradite the Wikileads founder to America.

2022

March 14 – The Supreme Court rejects his appeal request. The ruling means the WikiLeaks founder is running out of legal avenues to challenge his extradition.

March 23 – Assange marries Stella Moris at Belmarsh 

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Source: dailymail

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