Live updates | Reaction to Supreme Court's gun decision
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The Latest on the Supreme Court ruling on New York’s gun law:

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — Maryland Attorney General Brian Frosh, a Democrat, said his office will examine Thursday’s ruling to determine its impact on Maryland and “continue to fight to protect the safety of Marylanders.

“Today’s decision means more deaths and more pain in a country already awash in gun violence,” Frosh said in a statement.

In the statement, Frosh contends people carrying firearms in public places is a dangerous thing to have become the norm.

“The epidemic of gun violence sweeping our nation demonstrates daily the folly of introducing more guns into this boiling cauldron,” he said.

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MORE ON THE DECISION:

— Supreme Court expands gun rights, striking New York limits

— States with strict gun-permitting laws consider next steps

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Follow AP’s coverage of the Supreme Court: https://apnews.com/hub/us-supreme-court

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WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden says he’s “deeply disappointed” by the Supreme Court’s Thursday ruling striking down New York state’s century-old restrictions on the concealed carry of firearms.

In a statement, the president said the ruling “contradicts both common sense and the Constitution, and should deeply trouble us all.” He added that after mass shootings across the U.S., the country should be doing more, not less, to rein in firearm availability.

As Congress appears set to approve modest gun law changes, Biden urged states to go further and “enact and enforce commonsense laws to make their citizens and communities safer from gun violence.”

“I call on Americans across the country to make their voices heard on gun safety. Lives are on the line,” he added.

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NEW YORK — New York City Mayor Eric ams released a statement Thursday criticizing the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen.

He stated the ruling puts New Yorkers “at further risk of gun violence.”

ams said the city has and will continue efforts to mitigate risks of gun violence in the city, including reviews of defining license application processes and “sensitive locations” where guns are banned.

“We will work together to mitigate the risks this decision will create once it is implemented, as we cannot allow New York to become the Wild West,” the statement said.

“This decision may have opened an additional river feeding the sea of gun violence, but we will do everything we can to dam it,” he added.

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PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Rhode Island Democratic state Rep. Robert Craven said Thursday he wasn’t surprised by the ruling.

“I see the court headed in that direction,” he said. “It’s taking a stricter interpretation that the Second Amendment is absolute — it says what it says, you have a right to bear arms.”

Craven, an attorney and chair of the state’s House Judiciary Committee, questioned whether the court will now use that same thought process for cases about banning military-style weapons.

For concealed carry permits, New York’s requirements are more onerous than Rhode Island’s are. Craven said he represented the city of East Providence, Rhode Island in three cases where permit denials were challenged in the past decade, and the city prevailed in all three at the state Supreme Court.

Craven said he’ll read the opinion in the New York case to determine whether or not it creates a concern that Rhode Island’s requirements could be challenged, and whether that can be remedied by state legislation.

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NEW YORK — New York’s members of Congress reacted to Thursday’s Supreme Court ruling that struck down a state gun law. U.S. Rep. Elise Stefanik applauded the ruling and said it “correctly declares New York’s shameful attempt to shred Second Amendment rights of New Yorkers unconstitutional.” Stefanik is a Republican and staunch ally of former President Donald Trump,

U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand called the ruling “irresponsible” and “downright dangerous.”

“Our nation is in the middle of a gun violence epidemic and instead of working to protect our communities, this court has made it even easier for potentially dangerous people to carry concealed handguns in public spaces,” the Democrat said.

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NEW YORK — Thursday’s Supreme Court ruling that struck down a New York gun law requiring people to demonstrate a particular need for carrying a gun in order to get a license to carry one in public has no immediate impact on other laws, including rules on background checks and age requirements for gun purchases.

That’s according to Alex McCourt, the director of legal research for the Center for Gun Violence Solutions at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

McCourt said that instead, courts will reevaluate the laws, determining whether they violate the Second Amendment.

“It’s possible that these laws will face a new challenge, and that’s particularly true for any laws governing the public use of guns which was not previously considered part of the Second Amendment,” McCourt said.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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