MyPillow CEO and key Trump supporter Mike Lindell is filing a lawsuit against Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi to stop her and the House of Representatives from subpoenaing the pillow mogul’s phone records as part of their investigation into the January 6 riot. 

Lindell filed suit Wednesday against the panel investigating the insurrection, Pelosi and Verizon to stop the telecoms giant from turning over the records from November 1, 2020 to January 31, 2021, which the committee has requested. 

Those targeted by the committee have largely responded by countersuing. 

On Tuesday, commentator Sebastian Gorka filed suit to block their subpoena for his own phone records, saying it overstepped their authority. 

Former National National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, attorney John Eastman, Trump advisor Steve Bannon and other witnesses targeted by the committee have also sued. 

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, an ally and supporter of President Donald Trump who was seen before and after the insurrection at the White House on January 6, is trying to sue to block release of his phone records

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, an ally and supporter of President Donald Trump who was seen before and after the insurrection at the White House on January 6, is trying to sue to block release of his phone records

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, an ally and supporter of President Donald Trump who was seen before and after the insurrection at the White House on January 6, is trying to sue to block release of his phone records

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is named as part of the suit. Pelosi's committee to investigate the insurrection is also named, as well as telecoms giant Verizon

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is named as part of the suit. Pelosi's committee to investigate the insurrection is also named, as well as telecoms giant Verizon

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi is named as part of the suit. Pelosi’s committee to investigate the insurrection is also named, as well as telecoms giant Verizon

As the country hits the one year anniversary of the insurrection, the Democrat-controlled House continues to attempt to subpoena key Trump allies to try and find out if any of them are responsible

As the country hits the one year anniversary of the insurrection, the Democrat-controlled House continues to attempt to subpoena key Trump allies to try and find out if any of them are responsible

As the country hits the one year anniversary of the insurrection, the Democrat-controlled House continues to attempt to subpoena key Trump allies to try and find out if any of them are responsible

Attorneys for Lindell say that his actions related to the 2020 election are ‘motivated, in part, by his strongly held religious beliefs’ and that getting his phone records would violate Lindell’s freedom of religion, speech, press, political expression and ability to associate with others to advance their shared beliefs. 

This is at least the second time the committee has asked for Lindell’s communications. Lawyers argue Lindell had ‘no involvement whatsoever’ in that attack. 

The MyPillow CEO was at the White House even after the riot ended carrying papers with the words ‘insurrection act’ and ‘martial law if necessary’ on them. 

The lawsuit was given to St. Paul-based Trump appointee Judge Eric Tostrud.    

A spokesperson for the committee declined comment. Spokespersons for Verizon and Pelosi have not yet responded to a request for comment.

Lindell told CNBC Wednesday that he would sue ‘to completely invalidate this corrupt subpoena.’  

Lindell was scene after the riots on January 15 at the White House holding notes that contained language many liberals found disturbing

Lindell was scene after the riots on January 15 at the White House holding notes that contained language many liberals found disturbing

Lindell was scene after the riots on January 15 at the White House holding notes that contained language many liberals found disturbing

The MyPillow CEO was carrying papers with the words 'insurrection act' and 'martial law if necessary' on them.

The MyPillow CEO was carrying papers with the words 'insurrection act' and 'martial law if necessary' on them.

The MyPillow CEO was carrying papers with the words ‘insurrection act’ and ‘martial law if necessary’ on them.

However, it’s not the only lawsuit Lindell faces related to the election and the fallout. 

Dominion and Smartmatic, election software companies at the center of pro-Trump conspiracy theories, are seeking billions of dollars in damages from Trump allies, including Lindell.

In August, a judge denied motions to dismiss filed by Lindell. 

He continues to defend himself in court, arguing with other Trump allies that their remarks about Dominion and Smartmatic were free speech protected by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

Source: dailymail

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