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Deadly safety flaws mean the construction of smart motorways must be halted, MPs say today.

In a damning report, they accuse transport chiefs and civil servants of pressing ahead with the roads despite ‘major concerns’. 

The officials are said to have underestimated the risk of removing hard shoulders.

Technology designed to save lives is still not in use despite a promise given in 2016 to the Commons transport committee, which wrote today’s report.

‘Lives would almost certainly have been saved had the technology been in place sooner,’ the MPs say. ‘The promised safety improvements were delivered neither efficiently nor effectively.’

Their report raises serious doubts about stopped vehicle detection systems and calls for a review by watchdogs at the Office of Rail and Road.

Fifty-three people died on smart motorways in four years to 2019, with at least 18 of the deaths attributed to the smart motorway safety system

Fifty-three people died on smart motorways in four years to 2019, with at least 18 of the deaths attributed to the smart motorway safety system

Fifty-three people died on smart motorways in four years to 2019, with at least 18 of the deaths attributed to the smart motorway safety system

Deadly safety flaws mean the construction of smart motorways must be halted, MPs say today. In a damning report, they accuse transport chiefs and civil servants of pressing ahead with the roads despite ‘major concerns’ (pictured: deadly crash on smart motorway near Sheffield in 2019)

Deadly safety flaws mean the construction of smart motorways must be halted, MPs say today. In a damning report, they accuse transport chiefs and civil servants of pressing ahead with the roads despite ‘major concerns’ (pictured: deadly crash on smart motorway near Sheffield in 2019)

Deadly safety flaws mean the construction of smart motorways must be halted, MPs say today. In a damning report, they accuse transport chiefs and civil servants of pressing ahead with the roads despite ‘major concerns’ (pictured: deadly crash on smart motorway near Sheffield in 2019)

SVD technology is supposed to detect vehicles when they break down, alerting CCTV controllers and traffic officers so they can reach cars marooned in live traffic. 

The report says MPs on the committee raised concerns five years ago about ‘all-lane running’ (ALR) motorways, where the hard shoulder is permanently removed.

Safety measures in an action plan ordered by Transport Secretary Grant Shapps last year did ‘not fully address the risks associated with the removal of the hard shoulder’, the report says.

This is partly because he demanded only that National Highways, the agency responsible for the motorways, ensured emergency laybys were closer together in future schemes. 

For use by drivers who break down in live traffic, current laybys are up to 1.5 miles apart. But the committee calls for a ‘retrofit’ programme on existing schemes so they are a ‘maximum’ of a mile apart, or 0.75 miles ‘where physically possible’.

The report adds: ‘In conclusion, we are not convinced that the benefits of all-lane running motorways are sufficient to justify the risks to safety associated with permanently removing the hard shoulder.’

Safety measures in an action plan ordered by Transport Secretary Grant Shapps (pictured outside Downing Street) last year did ‘not fully address the risks associated with the removal of the hard shoulder’, the report says

Safety measures in an action plan ordered by Transport Secretary Grant Shapps (pictured outside Downing Street) last year did ‘not fully address the risks associated with the removal of the hard shoulder’, the report says

Safety measures in an action plan ordered by Transport Secretary Grant Shapps (pictured outside Downing Street) last year did ‘not fully address the risks associated with the removal of the hard shoulder’, the report says

Technology designed to save lives is still not in use despite a promise given in 2016 to the Commons transport committee, which wrote today’s report (pictured: Heavy traffic on the M1 'smart motorway' in Bedfordshire)

Technology designed to save lives is still not in use despite a promise given in 2016 to the Commons transport committee, which wrote today’s report (pictured: Heavy traffic on the M1 'smart motorway' in Bedfordshire)

Technology designed to save lives is still not in use despite a promise given in 2016 to the Commons transport committee, which wrote today’s report (pictured: Heavy traffic on the M1 ‘smart motorway’ in Bedfordshire)

It stops short of calling for the hard shoulder to be reinstated, saying the reduction in road capacity this would cause could push more vehicles on to ‘less safe’ local roads, resulting in more deaths and pollution.

Instead, the committee says the rollout of ALR should be paused until more data is available to prove they are as safe as National Highways claims. 

Five years of safety data is available for only 29 miles of ALR routes, making assessments for decision-making ‘limited’ and ‘volatile’.

The committee says the analysis should be extended to the remaining 112 miles of ALR installed prior to last year – and in the meantime the rollout should be halted.

Around 250 miles of ALR is scheduled to be in place by 2025.

The Government decided last year that this format should become the default smart motorway in England, but this was ‘premature’, the report says.

It notes that other types of smart motorways, where the hard shoulder is not permanently removed, have lower casualty rates.

‘Controlled’ smart motorways, which retain the hard shoulder but have technology installed, are the safest M-roads and ministers should revisit the case for them, the report says.

One of the most damaging passages of the report states: ‘Successive administrations, together with the Department [for Transport] and National Highways’ predecessor, Highways England, underestimated the scale of safety measures needed effectively and reliably to mitigate the risks associated with the permanent removal of the hard shoulder.

‘The Department and Highways England failed to deliver safety improvements to all-lane running motorways in a timely fashion, despite having promised previous transport committees that such improvements would be prioritised. Moreover, the communication of this radical change in the design of our motorways has been woeful.’

Demonstrators protesting against smart motorways march with coffins across Westminster Bridge to Parliament Square in London, Monday, November 1

Demonstrators protesting against smart motorways march with coffins across Westminster Bridge to Parliament Square in London, Monday, November 1

Demonstrators protesting against smart motorways march with coffins across Westminster Bridge to Parliament Square in London, Monday, November 1

Families of smart motorway victims carried coffins through Westminster yesterday to demand the immediate reinstatement of the hard shoulder, Monday, November 1

Families of smart motorway victims carried coffins through Westminster yesterday to demand the immediate reinstatement of the hard shoulder, Monday, November 1

Families of smart motorway victims carried coffins through Westminster yesterday to demand the immediate reinstatement of the hard shoulder, Monday, November 1

Coffin protesters in Parliament’s shadow 

Families of smart motorway victims carried coffins through Westminster yesterday to demand the immediate reinstatement of the hard shoulder.

Around 50 protesters marched to the Department for Transport to pile pressure on the Government to put an end to the controversial roads. 

The cardboard coffins symbolised the 53 people killed on smart motorways between 2014 and 2019.

Some of the protesters’ loved ones died after breaking down on all-lane running motorways.

Jack Gallowtree, who suffered devastating leg injuries in one accident, travelled from Wolverhampton to join yesterday’s Smart Motorways Kill protest.

‘I want to see smart motorways abolished,’ said the 33-year-old ex-model. ‘The Government needs to be held accountable for introducing these murderous roads.’

Mr Gallowtree was driving along a smart motorway section of the M6 near junction 18 in April when his motorbike suddenly began losing power and he was unable to reach safety without a hard shoulder. 

He required emergency surgery and remained in hospital for five weeks for a shattered knee cap and major wounds.

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The MPs praise the Daily Mail’s devastating undercover investigation into the safety of smart motorways. A reporter working at the South Mimms regional control centre in Hertfordshire for six weeks discovered more than one in ten safety cameras were broken, misted up or facing the wrong way.

Fifty-three people have died on the roads in the four years to 2019, with at least 18 of the deaths attributed to the system.

Tory MP Greg Smith, who sits on the transport committee, said: ‘The evidence in this report, along with excellent investigations by newspapers like the Daily Mail, highlight just how far we still need to go to ensure the safety of the great British motorist.’

Fellow Tory MP Karl McCartney, another member of the committee, went a step further, suggesting a full-blown public inquiry might be necessary. 

He added: ‘Smart motorways are, and always have been, a lazy, bean-counting and dangerously-held view of a means of trying to expand motorway capacity without spending any more of the huge amount of money raised by vehicle and fuel taxes.’

The inquiry finds that emergency services are struggling to reach the front of incidents on ALR motorways when all four lanes are gridlocked. It recommends that the Office of Rail and Road signs off major changes to England’s roads, becoming a de facto regulator.

Forty per cent of breakdowns on ALR motorways take place in a live lane because motorists cannot reach an emergency layby.

And a poll by the RAC found 60 per cent of drivers want ministers to go one step further than the committee’s report and scrap smart motorways, reinstating the hard shoulder.

Jim McMahon, Labour transport spokesman, said: ‘The Government must finally listen to what it is being told by countless victims’ families, or we face more tragedy on our roads.’

A DfT spokesman said: ‘We’re pleased that the transport committee recognises that reinstating the hard shoulder on all all-lane running motorways could put more drivers and passengers at risk of death and serious injury and that we’re right to focus on upgrading their safety.’ 

Source: Daily Mail

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