Prince Charles is facing a ‘significant uprising’ over his plans to build 2,500 new eco-homes on an area of Kent farmland – while the scheme could be delayed following a legal battle, according to locals.

The royal’s Duchy of Cornwall estate wants build the green homes – which will be powered entirely by renewable energy – on the outskirts of Faversham in Kent.

Bosses behind the estate argue the scheme ‘follows the Prince’s vision’ to deliver the ‘most sustainable’ homes possible, and will address a housing crisis in the medieval market town.

However locals have opposed the blueprints. They have raised fears that the eco-development will clog up roads and endanger wildlife.

And they say the Duchy of Cornwall, which is fronted by Prince Charles, 73, as the eldest son of the reigning monarch, faces a ‘significant local uprising’ over the proposals.

Now the plans have hit a setback following a legal row between the planning authority and a local developer who protested the scheme.

The fallout from the legal wrangle, which recently reached the High Court, could hold up the Prince’s proposals for more than a year, locals believe.

Prince Charles (pictured) is facing a 'significant local uprising' over his plans to build 2,500 new eco-homes on an area of Kent farmland

Prince Charles (pictured) is facing a 'significant local uprising' over his plans to build 2,500 new eco-homes on an area of Kent farmland

Prince Charles (pictured) is facing a ‘significant local uprising’ over his plans to build 2,500 new eco-homes on an area of Kent farmland

The royal's Duchy of Cornwall estate wants build the green homes - which will be powered entirely by renewable energy - on the outskirts of Faversham in Kent. Pictured: The site of the planned development

The royal's Duchy of Cornwall estate wants build the green homes - which will be powered entirely by renewable energy - on the outskirts of Faversham in Kent. Pictured: The site of the planned development

The royal’s Duchy of Cornwall estate wants build the green homes – which will be powered entirely by renewable energy – on the outskirts of Faversham in Kent. Pictured: The site of the planned development

Bosses behind the estate argue the scheme (pictured: A sketch of the proposals) 'follows the Prince's vision' to deliver the 'most sustainable' homes possible, and will address a housing crisis in the medieval market town

Bosses behind the estate argue the scheme (pictured: A sketch of the proposals) 'follows the Prince's vision' to deliver the 'most sustainable' homes possible, and will address a housing crisis in the medieval market town

Bosses behind the estate argue the scheme (pictured: A sketch of the proposals) ‘follows the Prince’s vision’ to deliver the ‘most sustainable’ homes possible, and will address a housing crisis in the medieval market town

However locals have opposed the blueprints. They have raised fears that the eco-development will clog up roads and endanger wildlife. Pictured: A graphic showing the areas of land

However locals have opposed the blueprints. They have raised fears that the eco-development will clog up roads and endanger wildlife. Pictured: A graphic showing the areas of land

However locals have opposed the blueprints. They have raised fears that the eco-development will clog up roads and endanger wildlife. Pictured: A graphic showing the areas of land

What is the Duchy of Cornwall? 

Dating back to the 14th Century and Edward III, the Duchy of Cornwall is one of the two royal duchies of England.

Unlike the Duchy of Lancaster – which is the private estate of the British Sovereign – the Duchy of Cornwall is the possession of the eldest son of the reigning monarch.

Currently therefore, it is Prince Charles.

And when Prince Charles ascends to the throne, it will become Prince William’s.

The revenues from the Duchy of Cornwall, which consists of around 53,000 hectares of land in 23 counties, mostly in the South West of England, goes to Prince Charles, who chooses to use them to fund his public, charitable and private activities and those of his family. 

<!—->

Advertisement

It comes following a legal challenge against the local authority Swale Borough Council by Quinn Estates, a developer which has protested the Duchy of Cornwall’s proposals.

The developer accused the council of failing to properly consult the public about the plans to build the 2,500 new homes on the 320 acres of agricultural land.

It also accused the council of not giving enough detail about the impacts that Covid-19 could have on the project.

Now it can be revealed that the High Court has ordered the council to pay £20,000 to the Quinn Estates.

The financial award was made at a Queen’s Bench Division hearing on November 23.

Speaking in the wake of the court decision, local Michael Cosgrove, who has lived in the town for 56 years, said the authority had appeared to rush to champion the Duchy’s proposals.  

‘The whole thing has been terribly handled. And the Duchy finds itself at the centre of a significant local uprising,’ he said.

‘If they had done this properly from step one there would have been time for proper consultation.

‘But now this will be beset by delays as opposing councillors quite rightly question every move.’

The 76-year-old added: ‘There is no way the council has had enough time to competently carry out this suite of assessments, so you can expect their new proposals to be very strongly challenged.’

It comes following a legal challenge against the local authority Swale Borough Council by Quinn Estates, a developer which has protested the Duchy of Cornwall's proposals

It comes following a legal challenge against the local authority Swale Borough Council by Quinn Estates, a developer which has protested the Duchy of Cornwall's proposals

It comes following a legal challenge against the local authority Swale Borough Council by Quinn Estates, a developer which has protested the Duchy of Cornwall’s proposals

Under the plans (pictured: An artist's impression of the plans), the homes would range from one-bed to six-bed, have solar panels and be powered fully by renewable energy. As per government guidelines, 30 per cent will be affordable.

Under the plans (pictured: An artist's impression of the plans), the homes would range from one-bed to six-bed, have solar panels and be powered fully by renewable energy. As per government guidelines, 30 per cent will be affordable.

Under the plans (pictured: An artist’s impression of the plans), the homes would range from one-bed to six-bed, have solar panels and be powered fully by renewable energy. As per government guidelines, 30 per cent will be affordable.

The council is supposed to consult the public under Town and Local Planning Regulations 2012.

It then must form a local plan based on their responses. But Mr Cosgrove said Swale Borough Council appeared to rush to champion the Duchy’s proposals.

He said: ‘A lot of mystery surrounds the thinking of Swale council.

‘There have been some serious irregularities about how this proposal has been handled.

‘They were caught out by not going through the proper regulations, as they were supposed to, and we have been left with a rushed public consultation.’

The controversial plan has already been branded a ‘monstrosity’ that directly contradicted Boris Johnson’s promise that no more homes would be ‘jammed in the south east’ on green fields.

However the Duchy argues the plan is ‘following the prince’s vision’ to deliver the ‘most sustainable’ homes possible.

The homes could be built on the land sandwiched between the M2 and A2 to the south of the town.

The estate acquired the plot 20 years ago and first proposed the plans in response to a call to landowners for potential housing sites in 2018.

The estate acquired the plot 20 years ago and first proposed the plans (pictured: A sketch of the plans) in response to a call to landowners for potential housing sites in 2018

The estate acquired the plot 20 years ago and first proposed the plans (pictured: A sketch of the plans) in response to a call to landowners for potential housing sites in 2018

The estate acquired the plot 20 years ago and first proposed the plans (pictured: A sketch of the plans) in response to a call to landowners for potential housing sites in 2018

It finally unveiled them at a public meeting and drop-in consultation late last year, with a view to lodging the plans next year.

Homes would range from one-bed to six-bed, have solar panels and be powered fully by renewable energy. As per government guidelines, 30 per cent will be affordable.

It is not the first time Swale Borough Council has come under fire.

In August it rejected a string of planning applications, including one from an animal sanctuary, which it called ‘whack’ in a bizarre administrative error.

It was running a dummy trial of software, with a staff member randomly refusing and approving applications with their own comments.

But the rulings stood, with the decisions and reasons behind them sent to the applicants in the post.

Of the latest gaffe Swale Borough Council said it was content it had followed standard procedures.

It said it would honour the High Court ruling and confirmed it had paid the £20,000 costs to Quinn Estates. 

MailOnline has contacted Swale Borough Council and the Duchey of Cornwall estate for comment. 

Source: dailymail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

Estate agent awarded over £180,000 after her boss refused to let her leave early

An estate agent has been awarded more than £180,000 after her boss…

Police Seek Help Identifying Body Of Pregnant Woman Recovered From Lake Michigan

CHICAGO (CBS) — The Lake County Illinois Sheriff’s Office is asking for help…

Grandal, Abreu Power White Sox To Win Over Pirates

CHICAGO (AP) — Yasmani Grandal and Jose Abreu homered, and five relievers…

Just Joking: Oregon Dad Claims No Animosity in ‘Let’s Go, Brandon’ Crack at Joe Biden

An Oregon father who saluted President Joe Biden on a livestream with…