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US track star Sha’Carri Richardshon has slammed the International Olympic Committe for double standards after it allowed Russian figure skating phenomenon Kamila Valieva, 15, to compete despite an ongoing investigation into her failed doping test.

The 21-year-old claimed in a tweet on Monday that ‘not one black athlete’ has been able to compete while under investigation for doping, and that the only difference between ‘her situation and mine’ is the color of their skin. 

‘Can we get a solid answer on the difference of her situation and mine?’ she wrote on Twitter on Monday. ‘My mother died and I can’t run and was also favored to place top three. The only difference I see is I’m a black young lady.’ 

‘It’s all in the skin,’ she continued. ‘[By the way] THC is definitely not a performance enhancer!!!!’ 

Richardson was disqualified from the 2020 Tokyo Games after testing positive for the marijuana after her test from the Olympic Trials came back. She claimed she took the drug after finding out from a reporter that her biological mother died. 

Valieva tested positive for banned heart drug, trimetazidine, in December at her national champsionships. Bizarrely, the reults were not reported by anti-doping authorities until last Tuesday after she was the star performer when Russia won gold in the team discipline a day earlier. 

A Court of Arbitration for Sport panel ruled on Monday that she will be allowed to compete because she is a protected person under the age of 16.

Trimetazidine is a heart medication drug that can increase blood flow efficiency and improve endurance and it has been abused by some Russian athletes to enhance performance. The drug is banned both in and out-of-competition by WADA. 

US track star Sha'Carri Richardson, 21, has slammed the Court of Arbitration for Sport's decision to allow Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva, 15, continue to compete in the Olympics after testing positive for trimetazidine (TMZ)

US track star Sha'Carri Richardson, 21, has slammed the Court of Arbitration for Sport's decision to allow Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva, 15, continue to compete in the Olympics after testing positive for trimetazidine (TMZ)

US track star Sha’Carri Richardson, 21, has slammed the Court of Arbitration for Sport’s decision to allow Russian figure skater Kamila Valieva, 15, continue to compete in the Olympics after testing positive for trimetazidine (TMZ)

A member of Kamila Valieva’s team has declared the Russian is too talented to need drugs

A member of Kamila Valieva’s team has declared the Russian is too talented to need drugs

Valieva tested positive for TMZ on February 8, after winning gold in the figure staking team event. Her test was taken on December 25 

Richardson claimed the only difference between 'her situation and mine' is that the track star is a 'black young lady.' She also slammed the decision to ban her over a non-performance enhancing drug while allowing Valieva to compete after testing positive for a drug that does

Richardson claimed the only difference between 'her situation and mine' is that the track star is a 'black young lady.' She also slammed the decision to ban her over a non-performance enhancing drug while allowing Valieva to compete after testing positive for a drug that does

Richardson claimed the only difference between ‘her situation and mine’ is that the track star is a ‘black young lady.’ She also slammed the decision to ban her over a non-performance enhancing drug while allowing Valieva to compete after testing positive for a drug that does 

Richardson explained in July on the Today Show that she had used marijuana after being shaken by the news that her biological mother had died. She found out from a reporter. 

‘It definitely was a very heavy topic on me and people don’t really understand what it’s like to have to put on a face and have to go out in front of the world and hide my pain.’

She was suspended from the sport for 30 days, ruining her chances of competing in the 2020 Olympics. 

Now the track star is calling out the length of time it took to receive Valieva’s results, which was taken in December.

‘[She] failed in December and the world just now knows, however, my results were posted within a week and my name [and] talent was slaughtered to the people,’ she wrote on Twitter on Monday. 

Valieva, who is only 15, is considered a ‘protected person’ since she is a minor and therefore is under different rules than adult athletes. 

Richardson, pictured in Eugene, Oregon, in June, wowed fans by completing her 100 meter Olympics trial in just 10.86 seconds, earning her a place on Team USA

Richardson, pictured in Eugene, Oregon, in June, wowed fans by completing her 100 meter Olympics trial in just 10.86 seconds, earning her a place on Team USA

Richardson, pictured in Eugene, Oregon, in June, wowed fans by completing her 100 meter Olympics trial in just 10.86 seconds, earning her a place on Team USA 

Hours before it was reported that Richardson had tested positive for marijuana in July, she sent a tweet saying 'I am human'

Hours before it was reported that Richardson had tested positive for marijuana in July, she sent a tweet saying 'I am human'

Hours before it was reported that Richardson had tested positive for marijuana in July, she sent a tweet saying ‘I am human’

Athletes under 16 like Valieva have more rights under anti-doping rules and typically are not held responsible for taking banned substances. The focus of any future investigation will be on her coaches, doctors and nutritionists.

Officials said on Monday that she could face ‘irreparable harm’ from the ban – much like Richardson, who faced immense criticism after the scandal broke. 

CAS stated in its ruling: ‘The panel considered fundamental principles of fairness, proportionality, irreparable harm, and the relative balance of interests as between the applicants and the athlete, who did not test positive during the Olympic Games in Beijing and is still subject to a disciplinary procedure on the merits following the positive anti-doping test undertaken in December 2021.

‘In particular, the panel considered that preventing the athlete from competing at the Olympic Games would cause her irreparable harm in these circumstances.

‘The CAS panel also emphasized that there were serious issues of untimely notification of the results in the athlete’s anti-doping test that was performed in December 2021 which impinged upon the athlete’s ability to establish certain legal requirements for her benefit, while such late notification was not her fault, in the middle of the Olympic Winter Games Beijing 2022.’

The 15-year-old is considered a 'protected person' due to her age and is evaluated under different rules than adult athletes. CAS cited that she could face 'irreparable harm' from the ban. However, if Valieva wins, there will not be a medal ceremony

The 15-year-old is considered a 'protected person' due to her age and is evaluated under different rules than adult athletes. CAS cited that she could face 'irreparable harm' from the ban. However, if Valieva wins, there will not be a medal ceremony

The 15-year-old is considered a ‘protected person’ due to her age and is evaluated under different rules than adult athletes. CAS cited that she could face ‘irreparable harm’ from the ban. However, if Valieva wins, there will not be a medal ceremony 

Athletes under 16 like Valieva have more rights under anti-doping rules and typically are not held responsible for taking banned substances. The focus of any future investigation will be on her coaches, including Eteri Tutberidze, doctors and nutritionists

Athletes under 16 like Valieva have more rights under anti-doping rules and typically are not held responsible for taking banned substances. The focus of any future investigation will be on her coaches, including Eteri Tutberidze, doctors and nutritionists

Athletes under 16 like Valieva have more rights under anti-doping rules and typically are not held responsible for taking banned substances. The focus of any future investigation will be on her coaches, including Eteri Tutberidze, doctors and nutritionists

However, Richardson isn’t the only person irate with CAS’ decision to allow her to compete. The decision has sparked outrage from fellow competitors who say it has whiffs of corruption and shows Russia’s ‘disregard for clean sport.’ 

American former Olympic champion Tara Lipinski said Valieva’s age should not be a factor in the decision and called her reinstatement a ‘permanent scar on our sport.’

And after the decision by the Swiss-based CAS, the Olympic Committee announced that while Valieva will be allowed take part in the women’s individual figure skating competition there will be no medal ceremony if she is among the prize winners. 

How Russian skating phenomenon Kamila Valieva’s doping scandal unfolded 

FEB 6: Valieva makes her Olympic debut in the short program section of the mixed team event. Her routine scores 90.18, just short of her own world record of 90.45.

FEB 7:  Valieva becomes the first female figure skater to land quad jumps in an Olympic Games, as her free skate routine seals victory for Russia in the mixed team event.

FEB 8: The medal ceremony for the mixed team is event is delayed due to what the International Skating Union (ISU) describe as a ‘legal issue’ which requires further consultation.

FEB 9: The ‘Inside The Games’ website names Valieva as the figure skater at the centre of a doping probe which is delaying the awarding of medals.

FEB 11: The International Testing Agency (ITA) confirms Valieva tested positive for the banned heart medication trimetazidine on Christmas Day. It says it is appealing the lifting of a provisional suspension by the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA).

FEB 12: The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the ISU confirm they have also filed suits to the Court of Arbitration for Sport, whose ad-hoc committee meets to determine the case. Valieva, who continues to practice in Beijing, makes an appeal by video-link.

FEB 14: The CAS announces that Valieva has been cleared to continue to compete. CAS cited ‘exceptional circumstances’ for the decision, essentially revolving around her status as a ‘protected person’ on the World Anti-Doping Code.

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Much like earlier in the week, where the Russian Olympic Committee (ROC) won gold in the figure skating team event on February 8, if Valieva places in any of her upcoming events, there will be no medal ceremony. The ceremony was postponed after Valieva’s test came back positive for trimetazidine, which can enhance performance. Because of this rule, Team USA did not get to accept their medals at a ceremony.  

At the team event, Valieva landed a historic quadruple jump – a first-ever by a woman at the Winter Olympics. 

Russia has been banned from competing at the Games for four years after several athletes were caught doping. Although individual athletes can compete for ROC. 

A CAS panel last night said Valieva should continue to perform due to the ‘exceptional circumstances’ of her case. 

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) said it was disappointed with the ruling because ‘it appears that the CAS panel decided not to apply the terms of the Code, which does not allow for specific exemptions to be made in relation to mandatory provisional suspensions for ‘protected persons,’ including minors,

‘Concerning the analysis of the athlete’s sample, WADA always expects Anti-Doping Organizations to liaise with the laboratories in order to ensure they expedite the analysis of samples so that the results are received prior to athletes traveling to or competing in a major event.’

The statement levied blame at Russia for not getting Valieva’s sample fast-tracked so that there was a result before the Olympics in Beijing.

‘The sample in this case was not flagged by RUSADA as being a priority sample when it was received by the anti-doping laboratory in Stockholm, Sweden. This meant the laboratory did not know to fast-track the analysis of this sample,’ it said.

US former Olympic champion Tara Lipinski posted on Twitter: ‘At the end of the day, there was a positive test and there is no question in my mind that she should not be allowed to compete. Regardless of age or timing of the test/results. I believe this will leave a permanent scar on our sport.’

Meanwhile, two-time Olympic figure skating champion Johnny Weir said: ‘I can’t condone the decision. There was a positive drug test, therefore the athlete who tested positive, at fault or not, regardless of age or timing of test/result, should not be allowed to compete against clean athletes.’

The United States Olympic Committee (USPOC) described the decision as ‘another chapter in the systemic and pervasive disregard for clean sport by Russia.’ 

Nevertheless, Russian officials welcomed the decision, with the ROC saying: ‘Tomorrow the whole country will cheer on her and all our wonderful figure skaters in the individual competition.’

Russian Figure Skating Federation President Alexander Gorshkov said: ‘I’m very happy for Valieva and glad that common sense and justice triumphed.’ 

DailyMail.com has reached out to Richardson for comment.  

Source: Daily Mail

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