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Sex scenes face extinction as actors are concerned about getting intimate in the wake of COVID-19

The future of steamy sex scenes in Hollywood movies or TV shows is hanging in the balance as the entertainment industry braces itself for new stringent rules associated with the spread of COVID-19.

DailyMail.com has learned that many actors have expressed concern about filming scenes involving kissing or intimacy in future projects once social distancing restrictions are lifted.

And major entertainment insurers are already drawing up new policies to protect A-list talent, on and off camera, which will likely lead to stars and production staff having to take coronavirus tests before stepping on set.

A leading Hollywood intimacy coordinator told DailyMail.com that the COVID-19 virus will likely change the production industry forever.

While an agent at top Hollywood firm United Talent Agency said everything in Tinsel Town is on hold until the issue is sorted out.

And DailyMail.com has also learned big name actors are seeking firm safeguards from studios before signing contracts, while the studios are worried some scenes will be uninsurable. 

Actors have expressed concerns about filming intimate scenes involving kissing in future projects once social distancing restrictions are lifted, meaning movies like Fifty Shades of Grey (pictured) would be come extinct

Actors have expressed concerns about filming intimate scenes involving kissing in future projects once social distancing restrictions are lifted, meaning movies like Fifty Shades of Grey (pictured) would be come extinct

Actors have expressed concerns about filming intimate scenes involving kissing in future projects once social distancing restrictions are lifted, meaning movies like Fifty Shades of Grey (pictured) would be come extinct

Major entertainment insurers are drawing up new policies to protect A-list talent, with studios worried some scenes will be 'uninsurable'

Major entertainment insurers are drawing up new policies to protect A-list talent, with studios worried some scenes will be 'uninsurable'

Major entertainment insurers are drawing up new policies to protect A-list talent, with studios worried some scenes will be ‘uninsurable’

Hollywood Intimacy Coordinator Amanda Blumenthal feels some productions will simply remove kissing or sex scenes all together to avoid dealing with potential safety issues.

‘I would not be surprised if for a period of time, until we figure out how we can work through this safely, productions choose to go down that route in order to make it on air – honestly that is something that could potentially happen,’ she explained.

Hollywood Intimacy Coordinator Amanda Blumenthal feels some productions will simply remove kissing or sex scenes all together to avoid dealing with potential safety issues.

Hollywood Intimacy Coordinator Amanda Blumenthal feels some productions will simply remove kissing or sex scenes all together to avoid dealing with potential safety issues.

Hollywood Intimacy Coordinator Amanda Blumenthal feels some productions will simply remove kissing or sex scenes all together to avoid dealing with potential safety issues.

The film executive, who is founder of the Intimacy Professionals Association (IPA) and has worked on hit series Carnival Row and HBO’s Euphoria, says some stars will likely refuse to film scenes involving smooching or screen sex due to the risks associated with COVID-19.

And she insists that a ‘safe work environment’ could mean love scenes revert back to the conservative 1920s.

‘One of my fellow coordinator friends joked the other day we are going back to the 1920s when there was censorship,’ she says.

‘Then you could not show anything and it was implied that they make love. Instead of a love scene they show a door closing and the audience realize they are going to have sex.

‘Nothing is being made right now, and there is a huge demand for content so that would be a way to push it through quickly.’

Blumenthal says introducing new policies or regulations could be problematic, however, as actors and talent are not allowed to share medical information by law.

‘There will be lot of figuring out with individual actors whether they will comfortable with the level of risk.

‘I have talked to actors, some say this pandemic will not affect whether they do an intimate scene.

‘For other people it is going to make a very big difference. Even before the pandemic hit there were actors asking for changes to scenes. I would imagine taking temperatures before scene would become common.

‘Obviously if there was an antibody test available that would be incredibly helpful, whether that is something viable, again we do not know.’

Blumenthal, who has worked on HBO’s Euphoria (pictured), says some stars will likely refuse to film scenes involving smooching or screen sex due to the risks associated with COVID-19

Blumenthal, who has worked on HBO’s Euphoria (pictured), says some stars will likely refuse to film scenes involving smooching or screen sex due to the risks associated with COVID-19

Blumenthal, who has worked on HBO’s Euphoria (pictured), says some stars will likely refuse to film scenes involving smooching or screen sex due to the risks associated with COVID-19

Intimate scenes seen in Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman's 1999 film Eyes Wide Shut may become a thing of the past after COVID-19

Intimate scenes seen in Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman's 1999 film Eyes Wide Shut may become a thing of the past after COVID-19

Intimate scenes seen in Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman’s 1999 film Eyes Wide Shut may become a thing of the past after COVID-19 

A top agent at United Talent Agency told DailyMail.com that there is ‘huge worry’ in the industry right now.

‘Everything in Hollywood is on hold at the moment, but moving forward there is a huge worry about getting insurance regarding virus concerns for projects,’ said the agent who asked not to be named.

Films known for getting everyone hot under the collar include Madonna's controversial Body of Evidence (pictured)

Films known for getting everyone hot under the collar include Madonna's controversial Body of Evidence (pictured)

Films known for getting everyone hot under the collar include Madonna’s controversial Body of Evidence (pictured) 

‘There has not been a health situation like this ever in modern Hollywood, and no company wants to put anyone at risk not just for humanitarian reasons but also for liability too.

‘For actors a romantic or love scene in a script is red flag at this time. Even if we get an all clear, lip or body contact in any scene is causing huge concern.

‘Very few performers would desire to put themselves at risk given this is a matter of life and death.

‘Senior agency people, film studios, talent and insurance companies are all discussing what will be acceptable or insurable.

‘There are many moving parts, but for the immediate moment love scenes are not happening.

‘In all honesty getting production insurance to cover the spread of a virus to hundreds of cast, crew and accessory staff, working in close proximity, is a challenge – let alone dealing with the insurance and liability needed for something as simple as a kissing scene.’

The agent added: ‘There is a huge desire to start work as soon as the social distancing restrictions are lessened, so everyone is working on ideas to overcome this.’

Ray Ossenkop, Managing Director of respected entertainment insurance brokerage Truman Van Dyke agrees.

He said the studios will have to make significant changes to insurance policies to avoid costly lawsuits.

Ossenkop said some scenes may even be deemed uninsurable because the risk is too great.

The veteran Hollywood insurer also said increased medical testing will likely be implemented before productions – adding that production staff and talent will be tested for coronavirus.

‘If there are any changes to policies that we will have to implement then it is the exclusions that have already been rolled out regarding viruses and pandemics.

‘There was not a lot of coverage to begin with, but there will be no coverage when it comes to insurance on that.’

Ossenkop said that insurance assessors will now exam movie projects much more closely and review the risk associated with COVID-19 scene by scene through storyboard or script reviews.

Studios will have to make significant changes to insurance policies to avoid costly lawsuits, claims one entertainment insurance broker

Studios will have to make significant changes to insurance policies to avoid costly lawsuits, claims one entertainment insurance broker

Studios will have to make significant changes to insurance policies to avoid costly lawsuits, claims one entertainment insurance broker 

He expects increased medical testing and guidelines will be implemented before and during shoots.

‘My belief is that they will have to come up with something just so it is safe for everybody,’ he said.

‘A company does not want to buy a claim if someone is sick or there is an issue.’

The Screen Actors Guild – American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA) said it is working to resolve the problem.

SAG-AFTRA National Executive Director David White told DailyMail.com: ‘We’re working aggressively with industry safety experts and coordinating with other guilds and unions on these issues.

‘No one yet knows when the industry will be able to return to work but we intend to be ready at the earliest possible time to ensure the safety of our members’

Movie fans will surely want to see the return of on screen intimacy as quickly as possible.

Films known for getting everyone hot under the collar include Fifty Shades of Grey, Eyes Wide Shut, Boogie Nights, The Disaster Artist and of course Madonna’s controversial Body of Evidence.

And who can forget Ron Burgundy agreeing to take Veronica Corningstone to ‘pleasure town’ in hit comedy Anchorman in 2004.

 

Source: dailymail UK

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