Internewscast
Image default
Home » The best boutique hotels in Santorini, including cave suites, caldera-view infinity pools and sunset dining
Travel

The best boutique hotels in Santorini, including cave suites, caldera-view infinity pools and sunset dining

Please note our writer visited the following hotels prior to the coronavirus pandemic

Home of the healthy Cretan Diet and cradle of the Minoan civilisation, Greece’s largest – and Greeks would say friendliest – island is perfectly suited to the boutique experience. Hospitable Cretans love receiving guests, so you can expect a hearty welcome – along with a glass of raki – in a string of independent hotels stretched between the peaceful seaside resort of Makrigialos in the East, to Chania’s bustling Venetian harbour in the West. From renovated monastic estates and caldera views, to infinity pools, great food and romantic vibes, here’s our pick of the best boutique hotels in Santorini.

Omma – deriving from the ancient Greek word which means ‘light’ – is an apt name for this peaceful 30-room property, which clings to a narrow spit of land that has dramatic caldera views on both sides. It melds organically with its surroundings thanks to clever use of fragrant plants, low-growing olive trees and huge chunks of volcanic rock. Service is exemplary: white-clad staff always there when you need them, but at the same time very discreet. The welcome package of champagne and fruit is complemented by delightful turndown goodies. Meals are taken on the breezy sea-view terrace.


Read expert review


From


£
360
Canaves (named for the kánaves, which were medieval wine cellars dug into Santoríni’s volcanic strata) is a caldera-view establishment. The style is Cycladic sculpted white on steroids, with scant colour accents. The infinity pool overhead is big compared to the usual ones at cliffside resorts here. Superior suites in both wings have private plunge-pools or a whirlpool tub outside. Rain showers are ubiquitous, as are king-sized beds (except in the most ‘basic’ Classic suites). The 45 square-metre river-pool suites in both wings, aimed at honeymooners, are particularly intriguing.


Read expert review


From


£
375
Canaves (named for the kánaves, which were medieval wine cellars dug into Santoríni’s volcanic strata) is a caldera-view establishment. The style is Cycladic sculpted white on steroids, with scant colour accents. The infinity pool overhead is big compared to the usual ones at cliffside resorts here. Superior suites in both wings have private plunge-pools or a whirlpool tub outside. Rain showers are ubiquitous, as are king-sized beds (except in the most ‘basic’ Classic suites). The 45 square-metre river-pool suites in both wings, aimed at honeymooners, are particularly intriguing.


Read expert review


From


£
311
Elegance is the leitmotif of this property situated in the stylish (and quiet) village of Imerovigli. Stairs coil down past the white, pale blue and ochre façade to a good-sized pool on a terrace with breathtaking views. The colour scheme is a traditional mix of blue and white, but the use of stripes, prints and different shades prevent it from becoming monotonous. For a small hotel the facilities are excellent: there’s a small gym, a cave spa with a large heated plunge pool, and a big infinity pool. As a deliberate policy the hotel is never fully booked, enhancing the sense of privacy.


Read expert review


From


£
308
This cosy, adults-only resort close to the mountain village of Pyrgos is a sanctuary from the busy streets of Oia, but well situated for visiting the island’s sights. The complex of black Santorini-stone houses was built to resemble a traditional village and sits atop a small hill which gives an eagle-eye viewpoint of the surrounding countryside. Flights of grey-painted steps lead between suites on several levels and a (small) pretty pool with views of fields and vines below. There’s a delightful little spa, a surprisingly good restaurant, and a member of staff for each guest.


Read expert review


From


£
243
The facilities for this stunningly renovated 18th-century opera house, in the heart of Thira town’s cobbled backstreets, are breathtaking. You enter through a small door and follow steps leading down to a spacious vine-shaded sunken courtyard with cushions on banquette seats next to a deep jetted plunge pool (there’s another larger one inside), framed by the two-storey building. There’s also a large cave-like steam room with twin rain showers, and a mysterious and romantic cave wine cellar for intimate dining. Quality finishes throughout heighten the sense of luxury.


Read expert review


From


£
247
Peace and calm prevail in this caldera-side hotel in the heart of Oia. The style is simple and wonderfully soothing, with everything focused on the spectacular panoramic views of the sparkling Aegean, caldera islands and most of the crescent of Santorini. There’s a small heated infinity pool while a larger, deeper pool is surrounded by sunbeds-with-a-view before they are replaced with additional tables for the hotel’s Lauda restaurant. The 24 Cave Suites are cut into the rocky caldera cliff and come with a charming little terrace. Some have plunge pools or whirlpool tubs.


Read expert review


From


£
232
Each cluster of suites at this boho-chic, adults-only, all-suite resort centres around one of five pretty infinity pools, creating four village-like areas in different parts of the property. From grey, high-backed sofas designed by local design company Lab 11, to the immensely high ceilings and the industrial iron staircase leading to a cosy bar, there is a sense of style and space throughout. There are 55 suites and two villas in eight categories; there’s a spa with a heated indoor pool; and a restaurant serving Cretan specialties.


Read expert review


From


£
246

Perivolas

Santorini, Greece

9
Telegraph expert rating

On the edge of Oia, poised on Santorini’s northern tip, Perivolas enjoys the celebrated sunsets without the crowds. The 300-year-old yposkafa – traditional cave dwellings carved out of the landscape – have been transformed into 20 spare but striking studios and suites. In keeping with the laidback style, the young, charming staff are just the right balance of unstuffy and attentive. The curvy infinity pool is the main draw, but wellness facilities are set among vineyards, with a 25-metre lap pool. Best of all, the hotel has a fleet of speedboats to whisk guests off to secret beaches, sea caves, and nearby islands.


Read expert review


From


£
526
The ‘Gallery’ part of the name denotes the original art on the walls of every suite, donated by past resident artists; this rotates over time. Design throughout is contemporary without being too in-your-face. As the name Voreina (‘northerly’ in Greek) implies, it’s on the quiet northern edge of Pýrgos, one of the most interesting of Santoríni’s inland villages, with narrow lanes to stroll and a Venetian summit kástro (castle). The views make a nice change, stretching north over farmland to Firá and Firostefáni, fetchingly illuminated by night.


Read expert review


From


£
168
It’s a hike to get here from Imerovigli along a cobbled and sometimes slippery caldera path but it’s worth it for the views and sense of privacy. Established in 1985, it lays claim to the island’s first infinity pool with striking views of lofty Skaros rock. The look is cheerful and colourful, with candy-striped couches in public areas and wonderful artwork; a style that continues to the four rooms and 22 suites. Breakfast is brought to your terrace, and lunch is room or poolside service. The dinner-only restaurant offers hearty, authentic fare.


Read expert review


From


£
204

Source:

Related posts

Even in our post-Covid world, steam trains offer a perfect trip back in time

InterNewsCast

‘An action-packed kids’ club has injected a fresh lease of life into Scottish uber resort Gleneagles’

InterNewsCast

The best budget hotels in Barcelona, including shady gardens and rooftop pools

InterNewsCast

Leave a Comment