Katie Quinn, an author and food journalist, has lived in three different countries during her pregnancy. She spent her first trimester in Italy, her second in the US, and her third in Canada
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An expectant mother who has lived in three different countries during her pregnancy has opened up about her decision to have her baby in Canada after comparing health care systems. 

Katie Quinn, an author and food journalist based in Toronto, spent her first trimester in Italy, her second in the United States, and her third in Canada, where she now resides with her husband. 

‘Living the global life that we’ve been fortunate enough to live, we needed to choose where to have our child, so I went about my pregnancy with that decision top of mind,’ she wrote in an essay for Insider. 

Katie Quinn, an author and food journalist, has lived in three different countries during her pregnancy. She spent her first trimester in Italy, her second in the US, and her third in Canada

Katie Quinn, an author and food journalist, has lived in three different countries during her pregnancy. She spent her first trimester in Italy, her second in the US, and her third in Canada

She had access to free healthcare in Italy, but she opted to pay for a private gynecologist because the local hospital didn't have an obstetrician on staff

She had access to free healthcare in Italy, but she opted to pay for a private gynecologist because the local hospital didn’t have an obstetrician on staff

Quinn, who lived in London with her husband at the start of her pregnancy journey, had relocated to a small city in southern Italy with a population of 55,000 a few months before she got pregnant. 

As an Italian dual citizen and resident, she had access to free healthcare, but the hospital in her area didn’t have an obstetrician on staff. The commute to the next closest hospital was an hour total, and she felt ‘the care was transactional at best. ‘

She opted to pay for a private gynecologist who was friendly and located just a five-minute walk from her apartment. She said she has no regrets about the cost. 

‘I’d soon learn that paying for a private obstetrician in Italy was downright cost-effective compared to paying for basic prenatal care in the US,’ she explained. 

Quinn and her husband (pictured in the UK) found themselves confused by what insurance provider they should choose and struggled with in-network options in the US

Quinn and her husband (pictured in the UK) found themselves confused by what insurance provider they should choose and struggled with in-network options in the US 

Quinn explained that her health insurance in the US was 10 times as expensive per month as a single prenatal visit with her private gynecologist in Italy (pictured)

Quinn explained that her health insurance in the US was 10 times as expensive per month as a single prenatal visit with her private gynecologist in Italy (pictured) 

Quinn and her husband were both raised in the US, and they returned home for the second trimester of her pregnancy. 

They found themselves confused by what insurance provider they should choose and struggled with in-network options. 

They ended up getting health insurance that was 10 times as expensive per month as a single prenatal visit with her private gynecologist in Italy. She also had copays to cover during each of her checkups. 

Quinn, who penned the 2021 book ‘Cheese, Wine, and Bread: Discovering the Magic of Fermentation in England, Italy, and France,’ was in her third trimester when she and her husband relocated to Canada after receiving their visas for a job offer in the country. 

They are now living in Toronto, Canada, where she has 'excellent' free health care

They are now living in Toronto, Canada, where she has ‘excellent’ free health care 

The 'Cheese, Wine, and Bread' author, who is nearing her due date, noted that she is self-employed and hasn't paid taxes in Canada long enough to qualify for paid maternity leave

The ‘Cheese, Wine, and Bread’ author, who is nearing her due date, noted that she is self-employed and hasn’t paid taxes in Canada long enough to qualify for paid maternity leave

She wasn’t signed up with the Canadian health system when she had her first appointment, but she was told that she would be ‘taken care of.’ 

‘The medical system in Canada is centralized, universal, and publicly funded,’ she wrote. ‘By the time I received my health card, it was added to my file, and that was that. 

‘There has been no exchange of money for the excellent care I’ve received — standard prenatal checkups and additional ultrasounds — although I’m sure it will be felt when we pay our taxes.’ 

Quinn, who is nearing her due date, noted that she is self-employed and hasn’t paid taxes in Canada long enough to qualify for paid maternity leave. 

However, after living in three different countries, she is happy to welcome her first child in her new home. 

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