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Coronavirus: Infected can see others after 10 symptom-free days

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has updated its guidelines for when people who have had the novel coronavirus can safely see others.

According to the new recommendations, patients are allowed to meet with others after they’ve gone at least three days with no fever.

Additionally, their symptoms need to have improved and at least 10 days need to have passed since they first noticed symptoms.

The updated guidelines come as states begin to reopen their economies and people begin considering going back to work and school. 

People with coronavirus are allowed to meet with others after they've gone at least three days with no fever, new CDC guidelines say. Pictured: A person wears a protective face mask in Madison Square Park during the coronavirus pandemic in New York City, May 24

People with coronavirus are allowed to meet with others after they've gone at least three days with no fever, new CDC guidelines say. Pictured: A person wears a protective face mask in Madison Square Park during the coronavirus pandemic in New York City, May 24

People with coronavirus are allowed to meet with others after they’ve gone at least three days with no fever, new CDC guidelines say. Pictured: A person wears a protective face mask in Madison Square Park during the coronavirus pandemic in New York City, May 24

They can also safely see each other if it's been 10 days since they first noticed symptoms. Pictured: A nurse wears personal protective equipment as she cares for a COVID-19 patient in the ICU at Regional Medical Center in San Jose, California, May 21

They can also safely see each other if it's been 10 days since they first noticed symptoms. Pictured: A nurse wears personal protective equipment as she cares for a COVID-19 patient in the ICU at Regional Medical Center in San Jose, California, May 21

They can also safely see each other if it’s been 10 days since they first noticed symptoms. Pictured: A nurse wears personal protective equipment as she cares for a COVID-19 patient in the ICU at Regional Medical Center in San Jose, California, May 21

The CDC says people who test positive for the virus are still contagious so waiting 10 days helps symptoms pass.

‘People with conditions that weaken their immune system might need to stay home longer than 10 days,’ the federal health agency said.

If you are exposed to someone who had a confirmed case of the virus, then you must stay home for at least 14 days to see if symptoms develop. 

‘Depending on your healthcare provider’s advice and availability of testing, you might get tested to see if you still have COVID-19,’ the CDC wrote.

‘If you will be tested, you can be around others when you have no fever, symptoms have improved, and you receive two negative test results in a row, at least 24 hours apart.’

However, not having symptoms or testing negative isn’t a substitution for practices including social distancing and good hand hygiene.

‘Limit touching frequently touched surfaces such as kiosks, digital interfaces such as touchscreens and fingerprint scanners, ticket machines, turnstiles, handrails, restroom surfaces, elevator buttons, and benches as much as possible,’ the CDC wrote.

‘If you must touch these surfaces, as soon as you can, wash your hands for 20 seconds with soap and water or rub your hands with sanitizer containing 60% alcohol,’ it adds.

The agency also advises using contactless payment and trash cans with foot pedals whenever possible.

If you are using a taxi or a ride share, the CDC recommends opening windows to improve air circulation in the vehicle.

‘Limit the number of passengers in the vehicle to only those necessary,’ the agency suggests. 

‘Avoid pooled rides or rides where multiple passengers are picked up who are not in the same household. Sit in the back seat in larger vehicles such as vans and buses so you can remain at least six feet away from the driver.’ 

If you are taking public transit, the CDC advises riding during off-peak hours, traveling six feet apart and frequent hand cleaning.

In the US, there are more than 1.6 million confirmed cases of the virus and more than 98,000 deaths.

Source: Daily Mail | Health

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