In the footage, shown during the BBC's The Hidden World of Football which aired on Tuesday evening, Hermes sets out different prices of players receiving yellow and red cars in games
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This is the moment a Llanelli Town footballer and his brother tell an undercover reporter they will spot-fix matches and charge £1,700 for manipulating red cards during games. 

Former Llanelli player Emile N’Goy, his brother Hermes and three European players were filmed discussing the illegal spot-fixing during an undercover probe as part of the BBC’s Hidden World of Football which aired on Tuesday evening.

Spot-fixing involves a player in a particular sport corruptly influencing a particular element of a match, such as a red card in football or no-ball in cricket, without trying to fix the final result – allowing criminals to defraud bookmakers through proposition bets.

Emile and Hermes are originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo but spent their childhood in France.

The former is currently without a club, but has played for a number of lower league-clubs across the UK including Llanelli Town AFC, Stranraer FC, Brechin City FC and Dorchester Town FC. He has also played for clubs in Portugal and Italy.

The two brothers and Idris Laib, Jean-Francois Mbuba and Julien Vercauteren – the three European players – deny all allegations of spot-fixing. There is also no suggestion that the illegal activity took place at any of their clubs.

BBC Wales secretly filmed Emile with Hermes across four meetings over a 20-month period after allegations were made that he may have links to professional fixers. 

In the footage, shown during the BBC's The Hidden World of Football which aired on Tuesday evening, Hermes sets out different prices of players receiving yellow and red cars in games

In the footage, shown during the BBC’s The Hidden World of Football which aired on Tuesday evening, Hermes sets out different prices of players receiving yellow and red cars in games

Emile N'Goy and the three European footballers pictured at the meeting with the undercover BBC reporters

Emile N’Goy and the three European footballers pictured at the meeting with the undercover BBC reporters

Spot-fixing in sport and how criminals can defraud bookmakers

Spot-fixing involves a player in a particular sport corruptly influencing a particular element of a match, such as a red card in football or no-ball in cricket, without trying to fix the final result – allowing criminals to defraud bookmakers through proposition bets.

It differs to match-fixing, where a participant deliberately tries to manipulate the outcome of a contest. 

The most high-profile case of spot-fixing in England was the imprisonment of three Pakistani cricketers – Mohammad Amir, Mohammad Asif and Salman Butt – along with agent Mazhar Majeed.

They agreed to bowl three no-balls at specified points during a Lord’s Test cricket match against England in August 2010 in return for £150,000.

Butt was jailed for two and a half years.

The world’s former No 2-ranked Test bowler Asif received a 12-month term. Aamer, then only 19, was jailed for six months.

Majeed was jailed for two years and eight months. 

He was first approached by an undercover reporter at a Llanelli match, who said they were looking to invest illicit, black market funds.

Emile told the reporter he would discuss the proposition with his brother.

At a subsequent meeting, Hermes told the reporter: ‘But you know that is not legal… so you have to be very cautious when you do this kind of thing.’

He then went on to suggest recruiting three players – a defender, midfielder and a striker.

Hermes later proposed recruiting a further two players and two members of staff to help with the illegal operation.

One of the members of staff was a man who had previously worked for AC Milan in Italy, though Hermes told the reporter that it was at a different club he had spot-fixed.

At the meeting, Hermes discussed how he would find footballers in the lower leagues of Europe, who faced less scrutiny over the illegal activity.

When the undercover reporter reconvened with Hermes at a hotel in Kent, he brought his brother Emile and the three European players Laib, Mbuba, and Vercauteren.

In the footage, they all told the journalists they had been involved in spot-fixing before, while Hermes told the journalists his brother Emile would also be involved.

They also remained at the meeting when told by reporters that they were not being ‘pushed or forced’ into their involvement and were given the opportunity to leave if ‘anybody’s not happy’.

Hermes told the BBC reporters they should expect to pay the players a yearly wage of between £17,000 and £21,400, to which one of the players asked if they would be paid in cash.

At another meeting, Hermes said they would need to pay a further £430 for every throw-in, corner or free-kick given away by one of the players.

Red and yellow cards are more expensive, costing £850 for a yellow and around £1,700 for a red, he added. 

Hermes denied any wrongdoing, saying 'I don't know nothing about that' and 'I don't know what you're talking about' before walking away when confronted about the allegations

Hermes denied any wrongdoing, saying ‘I don’t know nothing about that’ and ‘I don’t know what you’re talking about’ before walking away when confronted about the allegations

Terry Steans, who previously worked for FIFA as an investigator tasked with uncovering corruption, told the investigation: ‘The fact they’re there, they’re listening and they’re agreeing to what has been proposed… they shouldn’t be there and they shouldn’t be even listening to that kind of chat.

‘So that’s evidence in itself, that they’re in the room, that they’re willing to take part.

‘And he’s got players on board, like-minded that will do what he wants them to do, already. So I think he’s deadly serious.’

He added that spot-fixing is difficult to uncover without the full backing and resources of a police force.

When Hermes was due to meet the undercover reporters again, he was instead confronted by the BBC’s Wyre Davies.

But he denied any wrongdoing, saying ‘I don’t know nothing about that’ and ‘I don’t know what you’re talking about’ before walking away.

He later denied he, his brother and the three players had done anything illegal.

MailOnline has contacted Llanelli Town for comment. 

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