Share this @internewscast.com


Medical advice has been changed to give patients access to lifesaving blood clot-busting drugs longer than previously recommended in the hours after a stroke.

New research means the timeframe to administer the drug has been extended to nine hours after suffering a stroke, instead of the traditional 4.5-hour window.

Stroke is a leading cause of adult disability in Australia, with an estimated 27,428 occurring each year, the equivalent of one every 19 minutes.

Medical advice has been changed to give patients access to lifesaving blood-clot busting drugs longer than previously recommended in the hours after a stroke.
The time after suffering a stroke to access the medication has been extended. (9News)

A Stroke Foundation survey found that 40 per cent of Australians don’t recognise the signs of a stroke and therefore may not call for an ambulance fast enough to receive urgent medical care like the life-saving clot-busting drug thrombolysis alteplase.

Helen was able to get to the hospital within 45 minutes when she realised she was having a stroke four years ago.

There she was administered a clot-busting drug because she arrived within 4.5 hours of the onset of the stroke.

“The thrombolising injection was administered which stopped any further damage,” she said.

Helen suffered a stroke four years ago.
Helen suffered a stroke four years ago. (9News)

The change in the guideline to nine hours aims to save more lives.

“That means more patients will get treated with the life-enhancing drug and more patients have the best ability to recover from a stroke,” Stroke Foundation CEO Sharon McGowan said.

The guideline change has been made possible by an innovative research group named Living Guidelines, which collated the latest published studies, meaning clinicians have faster access to the most up-to-date information.

Stroke Foundation CEO Sharon McGowan speaks about changes to stroke medication access.
Stroke Foundation CEO Sharon McGowan speaks about changes to stroke medication access. (9News)

The lives of 320 Australian stroke sufferers have been saved already due to the guideline change.

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 21: A COVID-19 testing clinic sign at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital on January 21, 2022 in Sydney, Australia. NSW has recorded 46 deaths from COVID-19 in the last 24 hours, marking the deadliest day in the state since the start of the pandemic. NSW also recorded 25,168 new coronavirus infections in the last 24 hour reporting period. (Photo by Jenny Evans/Getty Images)

Your COVID-19 questions answered

“That’s 320 Australians that have benefited from one updated guideline, imagine what that can do across multiple chapters,” McGowan said.

Share this @internewscast.com
You May Also Like

Adelaide man Artem Vasilyev hit with fresh charges over allegedly plotting terror attack

An Adelaide man has been accused of plotting a terror attack by…

Victoria Police announce new weapon to target organised crime groups

The newly-formed VIPER Taskforce will begin duty on Monday, 4 July, following…

Missing eight-year-old boy found alive after more than a week in sewers

The boy, identified by authorities only as Joe, was reported missing on…

Two Townsville prison escapees caught, one more on the run

Two of three men who escaped from a Townsville prison farm this…

Toddler of Australian woman who vanished in Mexico may hold clue

Speaking to Today, from Moranbah in Queensland, Tahnee’s brother Daniel Shanks said…

Finland, Sweden will be invited to join NATO after Turkey lifts objections

Turkey has agreed to lift its opposition to Sweden and Finland joining…

Man charged over his alleged role in Sydney underworld murder

A man has been charged over his alleged role in the murder…

Russians fight to encircle Ukraine’s last eastern stronghold

Russian forces battled on Wednesday to surround the Ukrainian military’s last stronghold…